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The Arch and Anth Podcast aims to provides entertaining and educational content about archaeology and anthropology. Hosting the show is Dr Michael B. C. Rivera, an expert in the study of human biology, human behavior and human societies worldwide, from the earliest beginnings to modern times. Episodes come out every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, featuring a special guest talking about their work. More info at: http://archandanth.com/
 
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On this episode, Dr. Massimo Lando (City University of Hong Kong) hosts the show and interviews Dr. Michael B. C. Rivera (The Arch and Anth Podcast) about the move they're making to Hong Kong, and their reflections on the life they've led together since the launch of the podcast in May 2019. Michael created The Arch and Anth Podcast on May 13th, 20…
 
Today, Stefan Milosavljevich (Stefan Milo on YouTube) talks to us about his inspiration and process of creating YouTube videos all about archaeology, anthropology and human evolution. How did Stefan get started on YouTube and what first inspired him to start doing videos on his passion subjects of archaeology and anthropology? What does he believe …
 
On today's episode, Dr. Lena Karvovskaya (Utrecht University) is on the podcast to talk about her current work as a research data manager, as well as her earlier PhD research studying theoretical linguistics and the grammar of possession. In complex data management, how does Lena work with users with projects that need new connections? In what ways…
 
Aqeel Ihsan (York University) is a history PhD candidate focusing on South Asian diaspora currently living in Canada. Topics of Aqeel's interest include South Asian diaspora's memories of the 1947 partition of India into two republics (now India and Pakistan), concepts of 'home' and 'belonging', and how grocery stores, restaurants and kitchens at h…
 
In this episode, Dr. Katie Tucker (The Solomonic-Zagwe Encounters Project) takes us through her multitudes of osteoarchaeological research experiences, beginning with The SolZag Project that centers upon the interactions between the Zagwe Kingdom (900 - 1270) and the Solomonic Dynasty (1270 - 1974). For Katie's work at the Gännätä Maryam Rock Churc…
 
For this episode, Dr. Abidemi Babatunde Babalola (University of Cambridge) was interviewed about his work on the history of early glass production in West Africa, as evidenced through excavations at the site of Igbo Olokun in the Yoruba city of Ile-Ife in southwestern Nigeria. As a Smuts Research Fellow at Cambridge's Center of African Studies, Tun…
 
For this edition of the podcast, Sofia Carrera (University of Michigan) is on the show to speak about her new research looking at how early life adversity affects health, hormones and development, with her newest paper out speaking on these themes in the study of gelada monkeys. What is the landscape like in the Ethiopian Highlands, and how do gela…
 
Today, Dr. Noel Hidalgo Tan (SoutheastAsianArchaeology.com; Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre; SEAMEO SPAFA) is on the show to talk about public outreach, rock art and building capacity in regional archaeology in Southeast Asia. Noel currently works with the education and culture departments in Bangkok, Thailand, as part of the work done by the Southeast As…
 
In this episode, Dr. Sarah Son (University of Sheffield) introduces us to her work in Korean studies, performing human rights research and monitoring, and investigating news reporting and media, popular culture and social movements, as well as nation-building, identity, security and peace-building on the Korean Peninsula. What career and personal l…
 
On this episode of the Arch and Anth Podcast, Joshua Kumbani (Recentring AfroAsia; University of the Witwatersrand) talks about his work in music archaeology, ethnomusicology and experimental archaeology, studying the evidence of Later Stone Age artefacts used for music-making from the southern Cape of South Africa. How long ago does the study of m…
 
For this episode, Dr. Krishna Balasubramaniam (UC Davis) takes us through his research on behavioral ecology, human-wildlife interactions, primate health and disease and primate social evolution, studying both wild species living in urban and peri-urban settings, as well as captive monkeys. What is behavioral ecology and why are behavioral ecologic…
 
In this episode, Dr. Cara Ocobock (University of Notre Dame) talks to us about her investigations in human biology, anatomy, physiology, evolution, energetics and environmental adaptation. One the main projects she is involved in assesses cold adaptations among reindeer herders in Finland. What are the daily and seasonal activities of reindeer herd…
 
To close out the week, Carmen Lucia Cano Roca (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) is on the show to share her work in food science, food safety and Salmonella microbiology. Which multiple disciplines does food science draw from? For her PhD research, how does Carmen study how risks of Salmonella infection can be better controlled? How did Carmen take …
 
On this episode, Jayson Maurice Porter (Northwestern University) talks about Mexican ecological history, the tropical histories of medicine, technology and agriculture, Black and Latinx geographies, and how social and political manifestations of violence are intertwined with relationships between people and environment. What early life experiences …
 
In this episode, Dr. Orisanmi Burton (American University) calls in from Washington, D.C. to share his view on the Black Lives Matter movement this week, speaking as a social anthropologist who examines state repression, grassroots organization and the Black radical demands generated within U.S. prisons that imagine alternative futures. What import…
 
Imani Strong-Tucker (Griffin & Strong, P.C.; London School of Economics' International Inequalities Institute) is Operations Manager for a team conducting disparity studies and demographic and anecdotal data analyses. We talk about the Black Lives Matter movement, affirmative action policy in the U.S. and the various ways systemic racism keep Black…
 
In her work, Kyle Marian Viterbo (Science Friday; The Symposium: Academic StandUp) works and runs events mainly centered around science comedy, science writing and social media communication, racial and social justice advocacy, striving to decolonize the way science is performs, and supporting academics in their studies and research. How did Kyle m…
 
On this episode, we have Bill Auchter (Archaeothoughts; ArchaeoRPG) to talk about his career journey from bank teller to cultural resources manager, then from telecommunications archaeologist to archaeogamer. What is the history of Maryland, where Bill is based? How was he inspired by the Smithsonian museums closeby in Washington, D.C.? Why did Bil…
 
In this episode, Dr. Anna Ploszajski ('rial Talk; Handmade) is on the show to talk about her recent work so far in materials science, academia, science podcasting, science comedy and popular science book writing. What do materials scientists research, and what can we understand about different materials' properties by looking at their atomic struct…
 
Today, Jianne Soriano (Youth4IG, Cinema Escapist, Hong Konger Project) is on the show to talk all about her work so far on youth and internet governance, as well as promoting ethnic minority rights and stories in Hong Kong. A journalism graduate of Hong Kong's Baptist University, Jianne now writes, collaborates and creates online content for the ca…
 
On this episode, Gaby Lapera (Credit Karma) is on the show to talk about her exciting new podcast called the AnthroBiology Podcast, and how she was inspired to merge her earlier education in anthropology with her experiences working in online content creation and editing to start this science communication production. Gaby graduated with an MA in A…
 
Today, Dr. Akin Ogundiran (UNC Charlotte) talks to us about the archaeology of social complexity and cultural history in the Yoruba world, the heritage sector in Nigeria, and his collaborative projects on the archaeology of Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora. What transdisciplinary approaches and theories does Akin incorporate in his thirty y…
 
On today's episode, Dr. Stephen Maclean (University of Edinburgh) is on the podcast to talk about his experiences of transitioning from an anatomy student to an anatomy researcher to now an anatomy lecturer, co-ordinating classes on general anatomy, human osteology and the musculoskeletal system. How is anatomy typically taught through lectures and…
 
Dr. Anna Goldfield (SAPIENS, The Dirt Podcast, Cosumnes River College, UC Davis) is an anthropology lecturer, zooarchaeologist, podcaster, popular science writer, enthusiast of all things human and science communicator. On this episode, we talk about her foray so far into the world of archaeology, anthropology and online communications. Anna receiv…
 
In this episode, Pooja Swali (The Francis Crick Institute) takes us through her research using metagenomics techniques and approaches to study ancient pathogens, with an eye towards helping to measure and control infectious disease spread. At what point did Pooja first fall in love with archaeology, genetics and anthropology, and what was her path …
 
For this episode, Alexandra Kralick (University of Pennsylvania) talks to us about her research looking at great ape skeletal growth and development, ideas about sex differences in humans and other primates, and the biological anthropology science communication work she does online. What are the main differences between skeletons of the various gre…
 
For this edition of the podcast, Sgt. Nathan Tilton (University of California, Berkeley) is on the show to speak about his undergraduate course in anthropology, his work in disability research, and his ethnographic studies of military veteran experiences. Nate is a Lab Manager at the UC Berkeley Disability Lab, a makerspace where disability researc…
 
Today, Dr. Christina Cheung (Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle) is on the show to talk all about stable isotope analyses and reconstructing what subsistence strategies ancient people were using in prehistoric China, especially around the time of the Shang Dynasty (13th to 11th century BCE). Why is the site of Yin Xu, the capital of Shang Dynasty…
 
In this episode, Dr. Robert O'Malley (American Association for the Advancement of Science, or AAAS) introduces us to his work as Project Director for the AAAS's Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion program (DoSER). How can scientific research and findings be communicated to diverse audiences, including leaders and members of faith communities?…
 
On this episode of the Arch and Anth Podcast, Chanelle Zaphiropoulos (University of Malta) talks about her work in maritime archaeology, scuba diving to the seabed to observe and take measurements concerning the marine environment around historical watercrafts. What sorts of physical training can help divers control their breath, muscle strength an…
 
For this episode, Dr. Sabah Ul-Hasan (Scripps Research) takes us through their work in bioinformatics, venom microbiology and data science and education. How does Sabah see bioinformatics research influencing and benefiting our daily life and how the natural or human world operates around us? What are examples of evolutionary, ecological and biolog…
 
In this episode, An-Di Yim (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) talks to us about his PhD research looking into the various environmental and genetic factors that contribute to skeletal growth and skeletal form before human adulthood. What is the 'population genetics' approach and how can anthropologists use it to quantify the degrees to wh…
 
Today, Amanda Wissler (Arizona State University) talks about her PhD research investigating frailty and resilience among human skeletons dated to 1918 and associated with the Spanish Influenza pandemic. What are the basic definitions of 'frailty' and 'resilience' in the fields of palaeopathology and bioarchaeology? What signs of non-specific stress…
 
On this episode, Dr. Earvin Cabalquinto (Deakin University) talks about communications between Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) in Melbourne and their family members in the Philippines, and research themes that surround these communications such as the uses of digital networks and social media, the dynamics of familial and social connections, and l…
 
In this episode, Megan Kleeschulte (University of Tennessee Knoxville) talks to us about her recent work studying the awareness and implication of NAGPRA laws among medical examiners and coroners (ME/C) working across the United States. The Native American Graves Protection And Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), passed in 1990, established rules governing …
 
Historical, industrial and maritime archaeologist Anton Larsson (Stockholm University) is on the podcast today. He shares details about his PhD research looking at the impacts on archaeology and local community of landslides in western Sweden between 1,000–1,900 CE. How often and to what extent have landslide events affected Swedish communities in …
 
In her research, Professor Erin Thompson (John Jay College, CUNY) focuses on the legalities and ethics of art theft, curation and repatriations of heritage objects, antiquarian and archaeological foragies, the destruction of archaeological sites, and digital reproductions of cultural heritage sites. How common is the problem of art crime, and what …
 
On this episode, we have Dr. Ozak Esu (BRE Centre for Smart Homes and Buildings) to talk about electronic and electrical engineering. While also having done research on wind turbine blades for her PhD, she has also organized and collaborated in the design of electrical infrastructure and smart buildings since 2014. Ozak was motivated to pursue scie…
 
In this episode, Professor Ripan Malhi (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign) is on the show to talk about his career so far as a geneticist, genomicist and biological anthropologist, in particular working in the field of paleogenomics closely with Indigenous leaders, communities and research participants. How have the fields of human genetics a…
 
Today, Jordan Abell (Lamonet–Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University) talks about his current PhD research and collective body of work in geology, archaeology and paleoclimatology. One component of Jordan's recent scientific work is using geochemical methods to explain when animal domestication may have began as a practice among ancient peop…
 
On this episode, Dr. Justin Dunnavant (Vanderbilt University) is on the show to talk about his research on African diaspora archaeology, and his work with various organizations and initiatives that involve training up students in maritime archaeology, sharing historical knowledge with wider publics, and fostering relationships with communities. St.…
 
Today, Pierre Losson (The City University of New York) is on the podcast to speak about cultural heritage, restitution, nationalism and cultural policy, UNESCO and Indigenous communities. Some of Pierre's latest work looks at the reasons why three Latin American states (specifically Colombia, Mexico, and Peru) claim the return of cultural heritage …
 
On today's episode, Dr. Catherine Frieman (Australian National University) is on the show to talk about archaeological theory, gender identity and the role of women in prehistory, and the current state of public engagement in archaeogenetics and archaeology. With reference to the 'Egtved' individual, dating to the Nordic Bronze Age (c. 1390–1370 BC…
 
Kevin Bird (Michigan State University) is a genomicist and evolutionary biologist, and, in this episode, we talk about genetic variation in plants, ancient hominins and modern humans! Kevin studies a genetic phenomenon in plants known as 'polyploidy', which is when some plants have extra copies of genomes in each cell. What are some examples of pol…
 
In this episode, Dr. Catherine Ceniza Choy (University of California, Berkeley) talks to us about ethnic studies, Filipino identity and culture, the history of nurses working in America, and history of Asian adoption into the United States. What themes and topics do researchers in ethnic studies departments investigate and interrogate? What work do…
 
For this episode, Dr. Chris Stantis (University of Bournemouth) talks to us about her work using isotopic analyses to understand how people lived, moved and ate in the past. This is because stable isotope data can indicate for us clues about the environment surrounding ancient humans and what they were doing. Currently, Chris is working on analyzin…
 
For this Friday edition of the podcast, Dr. Kara Hoover (University of Alaska Fairbanks) talks all about a wide range of topics: the evolution of our sense of smell, human resilience and adaptability, studies of urban geography and social welfare, surveillance and much, much more. How important does she see olfaction for humans navigating different…
 
Today, Dr. Luíseach Nic Eoin (Nature Ecology & Evolution) shares with us her work as Senior Editor for a renowned scientific journal. We discuss what editorial work involves and how she works with scholars to release new findings to the greater scientific community. With a background in studying ancient plants and stone tool use in the past, how di…
 
In this episode, Dr. João Carlos Moreno de Sousa (Laboratory of Human Evolutionary Studies, Institute of Biosciences, University of São Paulo) takes us through his work in Paleoindian archaeology, prehistoric Brazilian stone tool analyses and science communication. Hunter-gatherer sites excavated by archaeologists have long been considered to conta…
 
On this episode of the Arch and Anth Podcast, Dr. Felicia Fricke (University of Kent; University of Leiden) talks about her work looking at the history of slavery in the Dutch Caribbean and integrating approaches from archaeology, osteology and oral histories. Her research focuses on the lifeways of enslaved people on the Dutch Caribbean islands of…
 
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