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The Law of Nations provides a unique insight into developments in international law. Focused on developments involving the United Kingdom, we draw on comparative law from around the world. Our aim is simple: to provide interesting and accessible updates in international law. This podcast was previously entitled The Arbitration Intersections Podcast.
 
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German Law Journal: GLJ Shorts and GLJ Specials

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German Law Journal: GLJ Shorts and GLJ Specials

Nora Markard, Emanuel V. Towfigh, and the other Editors of the German Law Journal

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The German Law Journal has been providing Open Access to Comparative, European, and International Law for over 20 years. Listen to #GLJShorts to find out what our most recent articles are about and to meet the person behind the paper. Listen to #GLJSpecials to dive deeper into selected articles or for an introduction into our most recent Special Issues. Find video versions of our podcasts on our YouTube channel!
 
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show series
 
with Linnea Wegerstad Link to the Article Linnea Wegerstad, Sex Must Be Voluntary: Sexual Communication and the New Definition of Rape in Sweden, German Law Journal 22:5 (2021), 734-752 The Special Issue Introduction to the Special Issue by editors Boris Burghardt and Leonie Steinl Table of Contents of the Special Issue "Sexual Violence and Crimina…
 
With Boris Burghardt and Leonie Steinl The Special Issue Table of Contents of the Special Issue "Sexual Violence and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century" GLJ Editorial for the Special Issue Link to the editorial article Boris Burghardt & Leonie Steinl: Sexual Violence and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century, German Law Journal 22:5 (2021) Abstrac…
 
With Matthias Goldmann Article from Issue 21:2 (February 2020): The Question of LegitimacyArticle from Issue 21:3 (April 2020): Privatized Migration Control – Special Issue "Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations"Article from Issue 21:4 (May 2020): Crime in Germany as Portrayed by the AfDArticle 1 from Issue 21:5 (…
 
With Jen Hendry, Naomi Creutzfeldt, and Christian Boulanger The Special Issue Table of Contents of the Special Issue "Socio-Legal Studies in Germany and the UK: Theory and Methods" GLJ Editorial for the Special Issue Link to the editorial article Jennifer Hendry, Naomi Creutzfeldt & Christian Boulanger: Socio-Legal Studies in Germany and the UK: Th…
 
With Yannis Kalpouzos and Itamar Mann Links to the articles Ioannis Kalpouzos, International Criminal Law and the Violence against Migrants, German Law Journal 21:3 (2020) Itamar Mann, The Right to Perform Rescue at Sea: Jurisprudence and Drowning, German Law Journal 21:3 (2020) The Special Issue Table of Contents of the Special Issue Abstracts Abs…
 
With Melanie Fink and Lilian Tsourdi Links to the articles Evangelia (Lilian) Tsourdi: Holding the European Asylum Support Office Accountable for its role in Asylum Decision-Making: Mission Impossible?, German Law Journal 21:3 (2020) Melanie Fink, The Action for Damages as a Fundamental Rights Remedy: Holding Frontex Liable, German Law Journal 21:3…
 
With Başak Çalı and Cathryn Costello Link to the article Başak Çalı, Cathryn Costello & Stewart Cunningham: Hard Protection through Soft Courts? Non-Refoulement before the United Nations Treaty Bodies, German Law Journal 21:3 (2020) The Special Issue Introduction to the Special Issue "Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Vi…
 
With Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen Link to the article Nikolas Feith Tan & Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen, A Topographical Approach to Accountability for Human Rights Violations in Migration Control, German Law Journal vol. 21:3 (2020) The Special Issue Introduction to the Special Issue by editors Cathryn Costello and Itamar Mann Table of Contents of the Spec…
 
With Cathryn Costello and Itamar Mann The Special Issue Table of Contents of the Special Issue "Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations" GLJ Editorial for the Special Issue Link to the editorial article Cathryn Costello & Itamar Mann: Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations, German L…
 
With Cathryn Costello and Itamar Mann The Special Issue Table of Contents of the Special Issue "Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations" GLJ Editorial for the Special Issue Link to the editorial article Cathryn Costello & Itamar Mann: Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations, German L…
 
What can an arbitration practitioner learn from the approach to criminal evidence? What duties does an arbitrator have to investigate suspected criminal activity? And why have the criminal courts ignored interim measures not to extradite parties to investment treaty claims? Angeline Welsh asks renowned criminal practitioner Tim Owen QC for the answ…
 
We are back with the second part of our property law episode. This time, my guest of the first part – Bram Akkermans – joined me to interview a true expert of property law. Dr. Jill Robbie is a Lecturer in Private Law at Glasgow University. She did her PhD on Water Rights and was at the moment of recording in Louisiana, helping to research a better…
 
This is part 1 of this episode. Part 2 will be released on 17th May 2018. After months of absence from the area of private law, we finally managed to record another episode on it. In this episode, Bram Akkermans and I talk about property law. We pick up from where we left off in #1 What is Law?: Are animals really objects of property and if so, why…
 
Many supranational organisations exist, be it the African Union, the Eurasian Economic Union, or the Association of Caribbean States. In this episode we will focus on just one of them: the European Union. Political parties all over its territory preach euroscepticism, which even resulted in the United Kingdom voting to leave: the infamous Brexit. B…
 
The United Nations comprises 193 states, all of which have legal relations with each other. But how are these relationships governed? International law is there to help: It organises, furthers, and reforms these relationships. Who defines what a state is and why is Palestine, among others, not always recognised as one? This 9th episode of Maastrich…
 
We don’t think much about it, but most of us have one: A citizenship. We are being born as Indian, Dutch, Bulgarian, Chinese, or some other nationality. But why do we have citizenships and what rights do they bring with them? Our first guest in 2018 is Dimitry Kochenov. Dimitry holds a professorship in EU Constitutional Law at the University of Gro…
 
Speaking alongside Prime Minister Theresa May of a post-Brexit UK/US trade agreement at the G20 summit in July, President Trump said:“We have been working on a trade deal which will be a very, very big deal a very powerful deal, great for both countries and I think we will have that done very, very quickly.”So what might that trade agreement look l…
 
It might seem so obvious: If someone misbehaves, e.g. by damaging your property, you may start proceedings or seek any other remedy available. You may also want to mediate to find a solution. This, in a broad sense, is access to justice. Who is able to achieve justice? Listen to this 7th episode of Maastricht Law Talk to find out! This month’s gues…
 
There are 7.35 billion people on this planet. We all have to live together and arrange our lives in a way that others can live theirs. But what if something goes wrong? Your friend borrows your phone and it happens: It falls to the ground. Who must compensate your damage? In our sixth episode we dig deeper into the private law. Tort law jumps in wh…
 
In this episode, Stuart H. Newberger appears in conversation with Helen Mountfield QC to discuss his new book, The Forgotten Flight, with introductory remarks from Ben Emmerson QC.On September 19, 1989, 170 people were killed when UTA Flight 772 was destroyed by a suitcase bomb planted by Libyan agents. Despite being one of the deadliest terror att…
 
European lawyers tend to have a hard time with United States Law at first. Too different are “both” systems, it seems. But is the Anglo-American legal order really that different? The fifth main episode of Maastricht Law Talk leaves the European continent for a while: It covers the United States legal system. From a federal judge being able to bloc…
 
Unfortunately we have encountered some problems with our audio files after recording. Therefore, especially during the first 5 minutes, the audio quality might not live up to our standards. Please accept my apologies for this! Did you get a coffee this morning or maybe a sandwich for lunch? Whether or not you were aware of it: You have concluded a …
 
This week’s episode is all about the United Kingdom leaving the European Union. With me for a second time is Aalt Willem Heringa – an expert in his field. If you haven’t listened to our episode on constitutions yet, you might want to do that first. Aalt Willem is Full Professor of Comparative Constitutional Law at Maastricht University and recently…
 
Hi, it’s Benedikt again and we are working hard to bring you a new full-feature episode soon. In the meantime however, Bram Akkermans has a fun fact for you: Why English and Scottish lawyers aren’t the best colleagues. Bram Akkermans is Associate Professor at the Maastricht University Faculty of Law and was my first guest on the show. Click here to…
 
It’s holiday season! Whatever you celebrate, very often this includes giving presents. For most, gifting is as normal as buying tomatoes in the grocery store. The law however has quite a hard time dealing with it. My guest for this special Christmas episode is William Bull, Lecturer at Maastricht University. William wrote his PhD on “Optional instr…
 
There are 196 countries in the world, which equals at least 196 constitution-like instruments. But what is meant by “constitution”? Must it be written, or does custom suffice? Episode 3 of Maastricht Law Talk is all about state organisation. Some countries have presidents, some a Prime Minister, and some even both. What is the difference between so…
 
This episode will consider the high profile phone hacking scandal, which shocked and fascinated the British public and brought down one of the UK's leading newspapers, The News of the World. This is well known – less well known is the role arbitration played in resolving many of the claims which followed. Angeline Welsh and Guy Vassall-Adams QC exp…
 
Punishing people for breaking the law seems self-evident to most. But why do we punish? Why is the state allowed to inflict harm on others? This month’s episode of Maastricht Law Talk deals with the theories and philosophies behind criminal law. It features everything from the emergence of criminal law through tribal law, to the development of comm…
 
In this podcast, Professor Christian Tams and Angeline Welsh discuss State Succession. The once relatively dormant doctrine of State Succession - which notably deals with the application of treaties to newly-established States - is back on the agenda with renewed vigour. Its most recent high profile exploration has been in the Sanum litigation, whi…
 
Here we are! Maastricht Law Talk’s first episode asks the question “What is Law”? Prof. Dr. Bram Akkermans, Associate Professor for European Private Law at Maastricht University, joins me to talk about the very basic foundations of law. We discuss why we need legal rules, the influence of morality, who can be a legal subject, which laws are applica…
 
In this podcast, Professor Sean Murphy and Alison Macdonald discuss bilateral claims commissions. The mass resolution of claims arising out of a particular inter-State dispute differs in many respects from more familiar ad hoc arbitrations. Sean and Alison consider why particular conflicts such as Iran/US, Eritrea/Ethiopia and Kuwait/Iraq, have led…
 
David Harris Sacks discusses,"To Winne Them by Fayre Meanes’: The Ethics of Exchange in the Making of the Early English Atlantic". Sacks is Professor of History and Humanities at Reed College. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Market Ethics”.
 
Christopher Tomlins discusses,"Revulsions of Capital: The Political Law of Slavery in the Epoch of the Turner Rebellion, Virginia, 1829-1832”. Tomlin is Professor of Law at University of California, Berkeley. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Market Ethics”.
 
Pierre Gervais discusses,"In Union there was Strength: Eighteenth-century Merchant Profitmaking and the Role of Partnerships". Gervais is Professor of English at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle - Paris 3. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Merchant Culture and Practices”.…
 
Robert DuPlessis discusses,"Commercial Practices at the Margins of the Merchant Economy". DuPlessis is the Isaac H. Clothier Professor Emeritus of History and International Relations at Swarthmore College. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Merchant Culture and Practices”.…
 
Dr. Craig Muldrew discusses,"Concepts of Capital: The Emergence of an Idea in England and Scotland, 1650-1800". Dr. Muldrew is Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Cultures of Capital”.
 
James Davis discusses,"The Ethics of Arbitrage and Forestalling Across the Late Medieval World". Davis is Senior Lecturer in Medieval History at Queen's University, Belfast. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Comparing Ethics and Institutions”.
 
Dr. Peter Stabel discusses,"Guilds or No Guilds. Is this the question? Market Ethics, Associational Life, and Economic Regulation in the Medieval City, Europe, and the Islamic World Compared". Dr. Stabel is Professor of History at the University of Antwerp. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Comparing Ethics and Institu…
 
Martha Howell discusses, "Whose ‘common good’? Parisian Market Regulation and the Corporatist Ethic, ca. 1300-1800". Howell is Professor of History at Columbia University. This talk was included in the conference session topic titled, “Market Regulation”.
 
Steve Hindle welcomes participants and attendees to the "Markets, Law, & Ethics (1300-1832)" conference, held at the Huntington Library on November 14-15, 2014. Hindle is the W. M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at The Huntington. Opening remarks are made by Simon Middleton and James E. Shaw. Both Middleton and Shaw are History professors at …
 
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