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Growing up in Los Angeles in a close knit family with a strong bond to her Cuban roots, Natalie Rodriguez, MD, knew she wanted to be doctor from an early age. She shares the story of how she found her way to UC San Diego to study medicine. Rodriguez also discusses her work with UC San Diego’s Student-Run Free Clinic Project and the importance of ro…
 
Moderator Stephanie Malia Hom joined Professor Joan Roman Resina to discuss Death in Venice and the work of filmmaker Luchino Visconti. Resina contextualized the film within the larger context of Visconti’s German trilogy and his long, storied career. He also discussed the film’s adaptation from the Thomas Mann novella. Resina examined the idea of …
 
Dilek Colak, PhD, shares the results of recent work identifying aberrant Ca2+ signaling in ASD astrocytes as a mechanism that contributes to specific behavioral and neuronal deficits. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37673]Bởi UCTV: UC San Diego
 
In this inaugural episode of The Art of Change, filmmaker, film scholar and Dean of Arts at UC Santa Cruz, Celine Parreñas Shimizu, talks about her personal history as well as her vision for the Arts Division at UCSC. She is well known for her work on race, sexuality and representations, and is the first Asian American female arts dean in the UC sy…
 
There are 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer's Disease. This program explains the latest understanding of the anatomy and functions of the brain and how it relates to neurological diseases. Dr. Gil Rabinovici is at the forefront of novel diagnostic testing to detect Alzheimer's disease as early as possible. He explains what Alzheimer's is an…
 
California is a pioneer in researching the impacts of and solutions to climate change. Getting to carbon neutral - or net zero carbon emissions - is key to curbing our increasingly warming planet. Dr. Roger Aines of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory talks with Climate Now's James Lawler about the latest research on ways to capture carbon. …
 
A school environment where trust, community and inclusion are valued allows students and their families to thrive. Tony Smith, Deputy Superintendent of Innovation for the San Diego County Office of Education, joins educators Gabriela Delgado and Morgan Appel to discuss how we can work together to support equitable outcomes for all. Series: "Educati…
 
The pandemic brought swift change to the world of education but was it a temporary blip or the start of a great transformation? What is the appetite for change in schools and are we supporting a climate that allows for it? Educators Morgan Appel, Gabriela Delgado, and Lisa Johnson Davis kick off a series of conversations on the state of education d…
 
Moderator Jennifer Tyburczy discusses the production and impact of HBO miniseries Veneno with star Daniela Santiago. Santiago talks about the process and pressures of portraying transgender icon La Veneno, and the importance of representation both in front of and behind the camera. She detailed the significance of La Veneno, including her famous ch…
 
Our series bringing arts and humanities practice to medicine continues with educators Holly Walter Kerby and H. Adam Steinberg as they show you a simple and repeatable method you can use to explain your work to the public via story and poster design. Series: "Let's Jam: The Arts in Medicine" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Show ID: 37996]…
 
UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose …
 
"Still We Rise" is a concert celebrating American diversity in music and the legacy of UC San Diego Professor Emeritus and pianist Cecil Lytle. This year’s program celebrates both the 25th anniversary of the Lytle Scholarship and the establishment of the Cecil Lytle Endowed Chair in African and African American Music. The concert features music and…
 
The use of yoga and meditation as complementary medicine is growing. In 2017, 14% of U.S. adults participated in yoga, according to NIH. Depression and anxiety are among the most common conditions self-treated with yoga. Yoga is relatively low cost, easy to access, has high social acceptance, and enables one to focus on the whole person. In this pr…
 
The Pacific footballfish is a large but rarely encountered deep-sea anglerfish known from only 31 specimens recovered worldwide. Strangely, over the course of last year (2021), three footballfish were found washed up on beaches in San Diego and Orange Counties. Scripps scientists aren't quite sure why these rare creatures are suddenly showing up on…
 
Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, screenwriters of "Captain America: The First Avenger," discuss the film with moderator Matt Ryan. Markus and McFeely cover how they adapted the beloved comic book hero to the screen, and their collaboration with director Joe Johnston. They explained in detail how they crafted the characters of Steve Rogers, B…
 
There is a long history of the interconnectivity of yoga and dance. Many dancers find benefits from the movements in yoga. In this program, dancers Ishwarya Chaitantya and Varsha Ravikumar talks about what they've learned and experienced as practitioners and teachers of dance and yoga. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medici…
 
UC Santa Cruz Professor of Music, Director of Jazz Studies, and Director of the Digital Arts and New Media program Karlton Hester talks about being appointed as UCSC’s first Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Arts. Professor Hester began his career as a composer and recording artist in Los Angeles where he worked as a studio …
 
Hugo Marcus (1880–1966) was a man of many names and identities. Born a German Jew, he converted to Islam and took the name Hamid, becoming one of the most prominent Muslims in Germany prior to World War II. Renamed Israel by the Nazis, he was sent to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp before escaping to Switzerland. In exile, he fought for homose…
 
This programs looks at the latest methods for treating cancer. Drs. Sam Brondfield, Jessica Gosnell, Lauren Boreta, Spencer Behr and Neil Neumann will discuss treating cancer with surgery, radiation and systemic therapy, and will present a mock tumor board. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37845]…
 
In this program, Dr. Maggie Waung and Dr. Jonathan Kleen discuss the neuroanatomy of the limbic system (hypothalamus, olfaction, hippocampus, amygdala) and how it relates to neurological diseases like epilepsy, amnesia and encephalitis. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37856]…
 
This CARTA public symposia focuses on the long and short-term impact of humans on the planet that we inhabit, and the consequences for the future of our species. This also gives us the opportunity to celebrate the memory of the late Paul Crutzen, who coined the term “Anthropocene.” It is relevant to ask how a single species evolved the capacity to …
 
Kate Crawford, author of "Atlas AI: Power, Politics and Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligence," is a leading international scholar of the social and political implications of artificial intelligence. This program looks at the intersection of art, activism and artificial intelligence. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Humanities] [Scienc…
 
Dr. Bradly Jacobs, a primary care doctor with Bluewave Medicine, talks about the clinical and experiential research of the benefits of yoga, including demonstrating various yoga techniques. He practices integrative medicine and advocates for a more holistic approach to healthcare. He started practicing yoga at age 25 and continues with it daily. Se…
 
Our series of bringing arts and humanities practice to medicine continues with Thomas Dooley, poet-in-residence at the Center for Compassionate Communication at UC San Diego's Sanford Institute for Empathy and Compassion. Series: "Let's Jam: The Arts in Medicine" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 37987]…
 
This program discusses screening for and diagnosing cancer. Dr. Sam Brondfield, Dr. Neil Neumann and Dr. Spencer Behr discuss screening tests for common cancers, the signs and symptoms of several cancers and the steps to diagnose various cancers. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37844]…
 
New scientific technologies in the laboratory have advanced our understanding of basic mechanisms of neurological disease over the past decade, changing the paradigm of how neurologists care for patients with debilitating and chronic diseases. In this presentation on multiple sclerosis, Dr. Joanne Guo explains how MS is an autoimmune disorder of th…
 
Dr. Songi Han, professor in the Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Chemical Engineering at UC Santa Barbara, talks about her research into the function of proteins in the body and how changes like protein Tau tangles can lead to neurological diseases like Alzheimer's. Series: "GRIT Talks" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37869]…
 
This program looks at the major functions of the brainstem and what role it plays in several neurological diseases. Dr. Maggie Waung gives an overview of how the brainstem works, and headache specialist Dr. Rebecca Michael discusses what causes headaches. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37855]…
 
Kyoto Prize laureate Robert Roeder has revealed the principle of the regulatory mechanism of gene transcription in eukaryotes through more than 50 years of research, by identifying the functions of a series of factors — including three distinct RNA polymerases, basic transcription factors, one of the first gene-specific factors, and regulators in t…
 
For thousands of years, yoga has been a path to re-orienting our relationship to body, mind, and spirit, opening ourselves to transformation. At its essence, yoga involves grappling with our perceived limits and transcending them through a shift in consciousness. Dr. Sudha Prathikanti and Dr. Priya Jain discuss yoga's psychophysical approach to sel…
 
Is the U.S. poised for a civil war? New York Times bestselling author and UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy's Barbara F. Walter, has spent over 30 years studying civil conflict. In her new book "How Civil Wars Start: And How to Stop Them" she examines the dramatic rise in violent extremism around the globe – in Iraq, Ukraine, Ethiop…
 
This CARTA public symposia focuses on the long and short-term impact of humans on the planet that we inhabit, and the consequences for the future of our species. This also gives us the opportunity to celebrate the memory of the late Paul Crutzen, who coined the term “Anthropocene.” It is relevant to ask how a single species evolved the capacity to …
 
Speakers Leslie Aiello, Michael Purugganan and Vanessa Ezenwa discuss humanity's past, present and future of the Anthropocene. Aiello speaks on how the human capacity to change the planet is not something new, but is rooted in our deep evolutionary past. One of the hallmarks of humans is our large brain size, which began to expand about 2 million y…
 
UC San Diego Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Institute of Practical Ethics, John Evans discusses the work of Kyoto Prize laureate Bruno Latour with UC San Diego Professor Emerita of Communication and Science Studies Chandra Mukerji. Latour has revolutionized the conventional view of science by treating nature, humans, laboratory equip…
 
UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering computer science and engineering professor Russell Impagliazzo hosts a one-on-one conversation with 2021 Kyoto Prize laureate Andrew Chi-Chih Yao. Yao created new trends in computer science and made great contributions to cutting-edge research in various areas, especially in security, secure computing, and …
 
Speakers Mark Moffett, Charles Kennel and Martin Rees discuss humanity's past, present and future of the Anthropocene. Moffett examines the effects of the most aggressive ants on the environment, arguing that certain invasive species resemble humans in their capacity for global conquest and environmental destructiveness. Kennel speaks about the con…
 
Cancer has been around for as long as we have. And yet, the landscape of cancer today looks very different than in years past. Dr. Katherine Hyland of the University of California, San Francisco, discusses sporadic verses inherited cancers, genes that prevent and cause cancer and how cancer-causing mutations occur. Series: "Mini Medical School for …
 
Cornel West, Ph.D., is a prominent and provocative intellectual. He is Dietrich Bonhoeffer Chair at Union Theological Seminary and has written 20 books and edited 13. He's best known for his classics, "Race Matters and Democracy Matters," and for his memoir, "Brother West: Living and Loving Out Loud." His most recent book, "Black Prophetic Fire," o…
 
Speakers V. Ramanathan, Nancy Knowlton and Jonah Western discuss humanity's past, present and future of the Anthropocene. Veerabhadran Ramanathan has had the privilege and pleasure of collaborating with Paul Crutzen for more than 40 years. Crutzen is one of the most creative, innovative and original geo-scientists of his generation. Nancy Knowlton …
 
Brenna Henn (Stony Brook Univ) explores patterns of genetic diversity across Africa and models for modern human origins in this talk. She discusses whether genetic data is concordant with archaeological data and suggests directions for future research. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Science] [Show ID: 3…
 
When the Second World War came to an end, Berlin, the capital of the Third Reich, lay in ruins. Few contemporaries, if any, could have anticipated that 70 years later, Berlin would boast large diaspora communities of Palestinians and Israelis who have made a home among Germans. In “The Moral Triangle,” Sa’ed Atshan and Katharina Galor draw on ethno…
 
This functional, polished, granite drinking fountain is an exact replica in granite of commercial metal fountains typically found in schools, business offices and government buildings. Instead of its usual context as interior office furniture, the fountain is placed monument-like on a grass island in the center of UC San Diego's Town Square. The si…
 
With relentless focus on scalability and innovation, how does society navigate the environmental impact of our global computing needs? George Porter, PhD, shares a path forward with an emphasis on how we teach students about computer science and how we design and build networked systems. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 3…
 
The ocean is enormous, indeed so large that for centuries we assumed that there was nothing we could do to substantially harm it. Unfortunately, we now know that this is not true. We are having success on some fronts, such as saving species from extinction, protecting ocean waters, fishing more sustainably, and restoring damaged ecosystems by repla…
 
John Baldessari decided first to transform the main doors of UCSD’s iconic Geisel Library and then to incorporate the entire lobby space, choosing students as his subject. The existing clear glass of the doors was replaced with glass in primary colors, perhaps suggesting primary sources of information. As the doors open and close, the colored panes…
 
The last decade has seen a dramatic capture of digital material for machine learning production. This data is the basis for sense-making in AI, not as classical representations of the world with individual meaning, but as mass collections: ground truth for machine abstractions and operations. What happens when data is seen as an aggregate, stripped…
 
David Brooks is an op-ed columnist for the New York Times. He is a commentator on The PBS Newshour, NPR's All Things Considered, and NBC's Meet the Press. His books include "Bobos in Paradise," "The Social Animal," and "The Road to Character." His latest book is "The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life," a New York Times No. 1 bestseller. A…
 
In 1992, for the Stuart Collection, Jenny Holzer created "Green Table," a large granite picnic or refectory table and benches inscribed with texts. Holzer's table and benches monumentalize an ordinary and functional set of objects. Like all tables, Holzer's work serves as an informal gathering place for students and faculty to eat, study, or play. …
 
Cancer is a group of over 200 diseases. Shagun Arora, MD and Sam Brondfield, MD, MAEd, explain the various types, their origins, and common methods of treatment. Hear how cancer is detected, diagnosed, staged and how patients are supported after treatment. Series: "Mini Medical School for the Public" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37842]…
 
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