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Learning your history makes you - and your people - stronger. As Black people, we know we’re left out of the history books. That the media images are skewed. That we need access to experts, information and ideas so we can advance our people. Black History Year connects you to the history, thinkers, and activists that are left out of the mainstream conversations. You may not agree with everything you hear, but we’re always working toward one goal: uniting for the best interest of Black people ...
 
Our goal is simple—educate white people on black history. The highest calling of humanity is to love. Whether you know it or not, the racial disparities in our country hurt us. They train us to protect our advantages rather than love others, and that mentality reduces us. New episodes will be released on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month. Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + for bonus content and the ability to vote for future topics, support us on Patreon at patreon.com/black ...
 
Black History is American History, yet it often isn't treated that way. Join me in discussions about this misunderstood and ignored history with experts and friends. If you believe that America cannot address its present and move forward without understanding its history and Black people's role in it, you've found the right podcast! New episodes every 15th and 30th! Website: https://wetheblackpeople.captivate.fm/
 
GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation series to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead. We celebrate Black stories and the lessons of our ancestors to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each episode, is a conversation on learning, living and elevating to our highest self with guidance from lessons of the past. Hosted by GirlTrek Co-founders Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison. Produced by: Ebony Andrews
 
Having long been in this region, Black Appalachians remain mostly invisible, while the dominant narratives of Appalachia depict an overwhelming, white cultural homogeneity. The Black in Appalachia Podcast challenges these misconceptions by highlighting how Black families have shaped and have been shaped by the region. Through historical and contemporary stories of people, places and experiences, hosts Enkeshi El-Amin and Angela Dennis interrogate what it means to be Black in Appalachia, crea ...
 
BHM365 is a weekly podcast series that explores the true account of African American History as American History. Hosted by author and marketplace entrepreneur Jo Anne Scaife, this podcast dives into the revolutionary research found in “Black History 365: An Inclusive Account of American History” a seminal work by Dr. Walter Milton, Jr. and Dr. Joel Freeman. Featuring weekly interviews with history makers and current influencers, special ‘round table’ talks and series, as well as community f ...
 
Welcome to Everyday Black History! Where we highlight the contributions of Black Men and Women both Past and present. Here we celebrate Afro Appreciation, where Black American, Africans and Latinos of African descent are honored. We also highlight Institutions that have help the advancement of people in the African Diaspora, such as historically Black University and many others. Enjoy Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/EverydayBlackHistory/support
 
The Black History Buff podcast is a fun and thrilling journey through time. Covering the full historical tapestry of the African Diaspora, you’ll hear tales covering everything from African Samurai to pistol-wielding poets. More than just a podcast, the show is a bridge that links communities throughout the African diaspora and enlightens and empowers its friends. If you'd like to become a friend of the show follow the links on this page https://pod.fan/black-history-buff-podcast You can fin ...
 
Black History is more than the common names we always hear. Each Friday, join Shaakira White, an HBCU grad and content creator, as she recounts the stories of those forgotten in Black History. If you want to learn more about Black history, are curious about all things Black, or just want to hear a great narrative, this is the podcast for you. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackhistorymoments/support
 
The African diaspora is a rich tapestry weaving through the course of time, with not only a strong impact on the American society, but throughout the world. The “Black History” podcast ventures to each week introduce an innovative topic, influential person or present interesting aspects of history related to the African diaspora to those seeking knowledge and enlightenment.
 
Meet BlackFacts.com, the Internet's longest running Black History Encyclopedia - Delivering Black History, Culture, Vides and News to our followers. This podcast series provides your daily Black Facts Of The Day™. In addition there will be occasion bonus episodes focused on diversity or other key topics of interest to our BlackFacts audience Learn black history, Teach black history - https://blackfacts.com
 
A comprehensive podcast on black history and black issues around the world. You’ll hear about subjects in black history that you won’t find in your average history curriculum. Each story is told in an entertaining narrative fashion that’s easy to listen to. I used to get bored in history class too. But black history is far from boring. The rich tapestry of experience that makes up the diaspora deserves its attention and that’s the mission of this podcast: bringing black history from around t ...
 
"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond ...
 
African-Americans have been mis-educated about their history. Many believe black history begins with slavery. The history of African-Americans is a proud complex mixture of pain and progress. Brittany Wilkins, engineer and herstorian takes the journey to return, not just to a land, but to a lost heritage of rich accomplishments. Can you picture a time where Africans influenced the world in developing civilizations in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics? If you want ...
 
Black Lives News BLC - Black History Podcast and LecturesLectures By The Best Black Authors In Audio Format To Download. All Authors Wrote Stories From Their REAL Life, Not Fiction.please support with 2$ or 8$ per month we try to stay alive and pay for the content to remain online👉🏾 https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=4MULNCT3RAC9E&source=urlSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/black-authors-audiobooks/support
 
A series of narrations from documents, speeches, and analyses of legislation that relate to the progression of events memorialized during the Black History Month observance at First United Methodist Church of Pasadena, CA. More of the content relating to the event can be found at "In Honor of Black History Month" at http://forums.delphiforums.com/entrances/messages/4286/1 Episode 1 is a narrated excerpt of Benjamin Bannecker's letter to Thomas Jefferson in which Bannecker urges Jefferson to ...
 
During the month of February, BRTW ensemble members are selecting personal Black heroes to highlight everyday. These heroes may have spoken the magic words that first made them see their Black beauty, the people who inspired them to become artists, or even the person who taught them how to make proper mixed greens. find us on: twitter and instagram: @thebrtw facebook: @Black Revolutionary Theatre Workshop and at our website: blackrevolutionarytheaterworkshop.org
 
This series of podcasts explores themes and highlights from the exhibition Black Greenwich Pensioners (1 Oct 2020 - 21 Feb 2021) at the Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich. In each episode, Claire Kirk (Head of Learning, Interpretation and Collections at the Old Royal Naval College), speaks to maritime historian and Black history expert, S.I. Martin, who curated the exhibition. Conversations delve into the research behind the display and what this research tells us about the lives of Black ma ...
 
Zaron Burnett’s dad didn’t want slavery to be his son’s only image of Black people in American history. So every night, he filled Zaron’s dreams with these incredible stories of Black cowboys. Despite what Hollywood taught us, one-in-four cowboys were Black. Their stories tell a bigger, braver, more honest history of America.
 
Hollywood and Crime is a ground-breaking true crime series about the most infamous murders in Tinseltown history. In The Black Dahlia Serial Killers, host Tracy Pattin investigates the sensational unsolved murder of Elizabeth Short. Known as the Black Dahlia, Short was a star-struck young woman whose body was found completely severed at the waist in January 1947. Many remember her tragic story, yet few know that more than a dozen other women died in similar circumstances around that same time.
 
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show series
 
Adam Lee Cilli's book Canaan, Dim and Far: Black Reformers and the Pursuit of Citizenship in Pittsburgh, 1915-1945 (U Georgia Press, 2021) is an assiduously researched book about the activism of African American reformers and migrants in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1915 to 1945. Adam Cilli argues that Pittsburgh is central to the story of the Bla…
 
What’s up fam, thanks for tuning into another episode of Black History Year. On this show, we connect you to the history, thinkers, and activists who are left out of mainstream conversations. But this week, we’re switching it up. Instead of our usual show, we’re sharing an episode of PushBlack’s newest podcast, “State of Criminal Justice.” State of…
 
Photography emerged in the 1840s in the United States, and it became a visual medium that documents the harsh realities of enslavement. Similarly, the photography culture grew during the Civil War, and it became an important material that archived this unprecedented war. Deborah Willis's The Black Civil War Soldier: A Visual History of Conflict and…
 
We are joined by Amber Webb Booker who is a lawyer by trade, but her true passion is empowering people through taking difficult or intimidating information and making it accessible, enjoyable, and understandable. And that’s exactly what we do in regards to today’s topic as we dive into the past and present history of the N-Word. Follow Amber on Ins…
 
Lynching, a form of violence in which a mob, under the pretext of administering justice without trial, executes a presumed offender, often after inflicting torture and corporal mutilation. In the United States, lynchings of African Americans became frequent in the South during the period after the Reconstruction era till around the 1980s. Website O…
 
No Future in This Country: The Prophetic Pessimism of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner (U Mississippi Press, 2020) is a history of the career of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner (1834–1915), specifically focusing on his work from 1896 to 1915. Drawing on the copious amount of material from Turner’s speeches, editorial, and open and private letters, Dr. Andre E…
 
Gramsci’s concept of hegemony is often invoked, but usually as a means of cultural critique and analysis. However, my guest Lorenzo Fusaro argues in his recent book Crises and Hegemonic Transitions: From Gramsci's Quaderni to the Contemporary World Economy (Haymarket Books, 2020) that Gramsci’s work is permeated by Marx’s economic critique and his …
 
In a world that purports to know more about the future than any before it, why do we still need speculation? Insubstantial speculations – from utopian thinking to high-risk stock gambles – often provoke backlash, even when they prove prophetic. Why does this hypothetical way of thinking generate such controversy? Gayle Rogers, author of Speculation…
 
Meryl Altman's new book Beauvoir in Time, published by Brill Rodopi Press (2020), situates Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex (1949) in its historical context and responds to criticism that muddles what she actually said about sex, race and class. She takes up three aspects of Beauvoir's work today’s feminists find problematic: the characterizatio…
 
Embracing Complexity is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and eminent historian David Cannadine, Princeton University. This thoughtful conversation includes an examination of different aspects of the societal role of both history and historians while rejecting the simplifying distortions of the historical record that we…
 
Olympias is known for being the mother of Alexander the Great and for being Very Fond Of Snakes. She was subject to centuries of slander by the historians who followed her - but in this episode, we right some of the wrongs, give you some context for her actions, and reveal her connection to the Olympic Games. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com…
 
Plato’s Heaven: A User’s Guide is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and James Robert Brown, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. This wide-ranging conversation addresses a central theme in current philosophy: Platonism vs. Naturalism and provides accounts of both approaches to mathematics. The …
 
Continuing our series on Britain's armed forces over the last two hundred years, Professor Jeremy Black, author of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency: a global history, talks to The Critic's deputy editor, Graham Stewart, about how Britain's armed forces handled nationalist protests and uprisings from the Mediterranean and Middle East to Africa and S…
 
Once described as a “German oddity”†, Ordoliberalism was one of a number of new liberalisms that emerged from the political maelstrom of the interwar period. But, unlike the other neoliberal splinters, Ordoliberalism – founded at the University of Freiburg by economist Walter Eucken and jurist Franz Böhm – was quickly tested in the real world. The …
 
In Finding Afro-Mexico: Race and Nation after the Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2020) Theodore Cohen examines the ways in which different protagonists sought to incorporate Blackness into Mexican national identity. After the Revolution in 1910, a group of intellectuals, researchers, and cultural producers elaborated on the meanings of Bla…
 
Marching across occupied France in 1944, American GI Leroy Stewart had neither death nor glory on his mind: he was worried about his underwear. "I ran into a new problem when we walked," Stewart wrote, "the shorts and I didn't get along. They would crawl up on me all the time." Crawling underwear may have been a small price to pay for the liberatio…
 
The Work of Politics: Making a Democratic Welfare State (Cambridge University Press 2020) advances a new understanding of how democratic social movements work with welfare institutions to challenge structures of domination. Steven Klein develops a novel theory that depicts welfare institutions as “worldly mediators,” or sites of democratic world-ma…
 
Sometime in 1678, the mighty Prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm I, known as the “soldier king” of Europe’s most warlike state, sat in his heavily padded throne surveying his army with an ambassador from France. With a row of particularly muscular lummoxes parading before him in bright red and blue uniforms with wide golden sashes across their chests, …
 
The extra Calvinisticum, that the eternal Son maintains his existence beyond the flesh during his earthly ministry and perpetually, divided the Lutheran and Reformed traditions during the Reformation. K. J. Drake's book The Flesh of the Word: The Extra Calvinisticum from Zwingli to Early Orthodoxy (Oxford UP, 2021) explores the emergence and develo…
 
Continuing the series on Britain's armed forces, in this edition of Black's History Week, Professor Jeremy Black, author of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency, talks to The Critic's deputy editor, Graham Stewart, about how British defence priorities adapted from the end of the Second World War to the first years of the Cold War. Don’t forget to subsc…
 
It is well known that cars changed America. But what about Black America? With America's long history of controlling Black mobility, cars meant many new freedoms for Black people. Yet, as they hit the roads through new places, new dangers lurked in the unknown. Both the dangers and the opportunities are the topic of this episode. My guest is Dr. Gr…
 
The digital age has touched and changed pretty much everything, even altering how historical research is practiced. In his new book Technology and the Historian: Transformations in the Digital Age (University of Illinois Press, 2021), Adam Crymble makes a meta-historical account of how digital and technological advances have impacted historical res…
 
During the height of Muslim power in Mughal South Asia, Hindu and Muslim scholars worked collaboratively to translate a large body of Hindu Sanskrit texts into the Persian language. Translating Wisdom reconstructs the intellectual processes and exchanges that underlay these translations. Using as a case study the 1597 Persian rendition of the Yoga-…
 
English has borrowed more words from French than from any other modern foreign language. French words and phrases—such as à la mode, ennui, naïveté and caprice—lend English a certain je-ne-sais-quoi that would otherwise elude the language. Richard Scholar examines the continuing history of untranslated French words in English and asks what these wo…
 
Political Scientist Nathan Kalmoe has written a fascinating historical and political exploration of the connections between violence and partisanship before, during, and after the American Civil War. This book brings together work by historians and political scientists and straddles both disciplines in the examination of the way that partisan polit…
 
The digital age has touched and changed pretty much everything, even altering how historical research is practiced. In his new book Technology and the Historian: Transformations in the Digital Age (University of Illinois Press, 2021), Adam Crymble makes a meta-historical account of how digital and technological advances have impacted historical res…
 
Babbling Barbarians: How Translators Keep Us Civilized is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Princeton University Professor David Bellos, author of the bestselling book, Is That A Fish in Your Ear? Translation and the Meaning of Everything, many fascinating features of language and translation are explored at length.…
 
We live in a networked world. Online social networking platforms and the World Wide Web have changed how society thinks about connectivity. Because of the technological nature of such networks, their study has predominantly taken place within the domains of computer science and related scientific fields. But arts and humanities scholars are increas…
 
Literature is a technology like any other. And the writers we revere--from Homer, Shakespeare, Austen, and others--each made a unique technical breakthrough that can be viewed as both a narrative and neuroscientific advancement. Literature's great invention was to address problems we could not solve: not how to start a fire or build a boat, but how…
 
Is Jared Diamond's 1997 bestseller a work of staggering genius, or a piece of intellectual garbage? Has it moved our understanding of humanity forward, or has it set us back by decades? Are these binary choices ridiculously limiting? Totally! In this episode Sebastian does his best to parse the good ideas from Guns, Germs, and Steel, while also eng…
 
Pan plays a central role in European mythology, originating as a figure who represented all that was impossible to tame in the world, something anyone who has ever worked with goats will understand. This primitive origin was slowly assimilated by the Greeks as a celebration of life and vitality, although through Plato’s radical dualism and the mora…
 
Ryan Ruby is a writer and translator from Los Angeles, California. His fiction and criticism have appeared in The New York Review of Books, The Paris Review Daily, Conjunctions, n+1, The Baffler, and elsewhere. The piece we are discussing here is Child’s Play. What can Wittgenstein teach us about raising kids published in June 2021 in The Believer.…
 
Early 20th century Southeast Asia was arguably home to the once of the most vibrant and diverse caldrons of revolutionary ferment in world history. Revolts against Western imperialism and traditional socio-economic structures developed into a range of utopian experiments. In Republicanism, Communism, Islam: Cosmopolitan Origins of Revolution in Sou…
 
Nicholas Harrison's Our Civilizing Mission: The Lessons of Colonial Education (Liverpool UP, 2019) is a fascinating examination of colonial education not just as a facet of colonialism, but as an "example" of education in a broader sense, albeit an "extreme" one. At once a historical study, a series of close readings of texts, ideas, and authors, a…
 
When a shocking crime occurs, people ask “WHY?” Was it about power, ego, or revenge? On KILLER PSYCHE, former FBI criminal profiler Candice DeLong draws on her decades of experience to reveal why these murderers and criminals committed these acts. She will reveal fascinating new details about what drove these people, including cases she worked on f…
 
We’re getting back to basics as we use our 101st episode to review some Satanism 101 -- with the benefit of a few years’ extra perspective. SHOW LINKS New York Post: Demons Haunt Victims By Text The Satan by Ryan E Stokes Satan: A Biography by Henry Ansgar Kelly The Origin of Satan by Elaine Pagels Children of Lucifer by Ruben Van Luijk Satanic Fem…
 
Part 2 - Madam C.J. Walker (born Sarah Breedlove; December 23, 1867 – May 25, 1919) was an African American entrepreneur, philanthropist, and political and social activist. She is recorded as the first female self-made millionaire in America. (Multiple sources mention that although other women might have been the first, their wealth is not as well-…
 
"The point of studying the world – including the past and other’s writings – is not just to understand it but to use that understanding to change it." – Harry Cleaver (33 Lessons from Capital – On Reading Marx Politically) Listening to Robert Ovetz explain the origins of his interest in the study of labor and his academic influences I was reminded …
 
Eating One’s Own: Examining Civil War is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and intellectual historian David Armitage, the Lloyd C. Blanfein Professor of History at Harvard University. This conversation covers Prof. Armitage’s extensive research on the history of ideas of civil war from Ancient Rome to the present. A sal…
 
The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled du…
 
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