Philadelphia History công khai
[search 0]
Thêm

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
We begin the harrowing and alarming story of "The Clansman," in Philadelphia. Although this play by the author Thomas W. Dixon is know as the progenitor to the 1915 D.W. Griffith film "Birth of the Nation," few are aware of its early controversial history, The narrative begins in the streets outside the Walnut Street Theatre, as a large crowd of th…
 
A re-broadcast of an episode originally released in November of 2021. In honor of Native American Heritage Month, an exploration of performances by Indigenous People in theaters of the City of Philadelphia in the 19th Century. We also detail plays by white performers that supposedly depicted Native people and stories in that period. The attached im…
 
The mob is gathering in the street outside the Chestnut Street Theatre, while inside the rehearsals for the scandalous play The Quaker City go on! The thrilling conclusion of our three part series! Will it all end in a deadly riot? The suspense is building . . For a blog post about this episode, with more information and images about the people and…
 
George Lippard's novel "The Quaker City, or the Monk's of Monk Hall" is made into a new play. The excitement about it builds in Philadelphia, just as the national election of 1844 roils the city. We learn more about the young Philadelphia writer, and how he was recruited by theater manager Francis Wemyss to provide a script for his Chestnut Street …
 
The theater of Philadelphia was being staged during the roiling years of the 1840s. Bankruptcies, riots, labor unrest, growing religious fervor and racial tensions, rising crime (and public perception of crime due to increasing availability of journals and newspapers) were everywhere. This is the context for the first episode of our Season Two: "Dr…
 
A quick announcement about our upcoming season of new episodes! © Podcast text copyright, Peter Schmitz 2021/2022. All rights reserved. ℗ All voice recordings copyright Peter Schmitz 2021/2022. ℗ All recordings of original music and compositions within the episodes, copyright Christopher Mark Colucci 2021/2022. Used by permission.…
 
Jasper Deeter formed Philadelphia's oldest repertory theater company in 1923. Though seemingly self-isolated in the small and intense community of theater workers he had founded, his work as a director, actor, visionary and longtime acting teacher had a profound affect on shaping Philadelphia's - and America's - theater for years to come. In this s…
 
This special episode of the podcast goes on a journey to the Paul Robeson House and Museum in Philadelphia. Included is an interview with Janice Sykes-Ross of the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, and a recording of a live tour of the Paul Robeson House with docent Terry Fimiano Guerin. For a blog post on our website with additional information,…
 
Like the ghost of Hamlet's father, John Barrymore wouldn't stay still and kept showing up! A chapter about Philadelphia's most famous acting family, from Wicked Philadelphia, a book by Thomas H. Keels Wicked Philadelphia: Sin in the City of Brotherly Love by Thomas Keels, is available on Amazon.com. Please visit Tom's website, www.thomaskeels.com, …
 
As an addendum to Season One, here are six more stories of 19th C. Philadelphia theater. We discuss Alexander Reinagle, Joseph Jefferson III, James Murdoch, Matilda Heron, John McCullough - as well as two stagehands at the Walnut Street Theater you likely never heard of before, but may never forget! To see images and more information about today's …
 
An interview/conversation with Jonathan Shandell, the author of a January 2022 article in the journal Theater History Studies entitled "Caricatured, Marginalized, Betrayed". The article examines the history of the Philadelphia "Negro Unit" of the Federal Theatre Project in the 1930s - specifically the history of three plays produced by the FTP at t…
 
January 1990: The appointment of Mary B. Robinson as the new Artistic Director of the Philadelphia Drama Guild is announced, taking over from outgoing Artistic Director Gregory Poggi. Robinson's tenure at the Drama Guild was slated to begin in August of 1990, so she could move back to Philadelphia and start planning her first season. At a press con…
 
From the 1876 Centennial Exposition to the end of the 19th Century, Philadelphia's experienced a boom in theater construction. New plays, musicals, operettas and vaudeville shows constantly cycled in and out of the city to fill these theaters. By the 1890s, one newspaperman estimated that on average each of Philadelphia's one million people saw fiv…
 
John A. Arneaux plays "Richard III" at the Academy of Music, then mysteriously exits the American stage. His co-star, the actor Henri Strange, remains - and strives to create a Shakespeare theater for Philadelphia's Black audiences. The second half of a two-part story. Guest Voices John A. Arneaux: Aaron Bell Reporter: Bill Van Horn R. Henri Strang…
 
John A. Arneaux billed himself as "The Black Booth" and starred in a one-night all-Black production of Shakespeare's "Richard III' at Philadelphia's prestigious Academy of Music in January 1887. Who was he, where had he come from, and why had he chosen Philadelphia for this audacious feat? We explore his fascinating story in the first of our two ep…
 
Before ending their occupation of Philadelphia in 1778, the British threw themselves a hell of a theatre party! Knights and heralds, pageantry and theatricals, pomp and parading, feasting and flirting, all-night dancing and oh-so-many borrowed mirrors. Learn all about it from Peter's reading of the chapter "Oh, It's a Lovely War: The Mischianza 177…
 
The story of one of America's most infamous - and influential - performance traditions, as it specifically relates to the history of theater in Philadelphia. For blog post with images and more thoughts about this topic, go to: https://www.aithpodcast.com/blog/where-our-mothers-and-fathers-laughed-their-troubles-away/ An additional blog post, with t…
 
The famous 19th Century American tragic actress - and the 2Oth Century Philadelphia women who founded an organization in her honor. For a blog post on our website about this episode, go to: https://www.aithpodcast.com/blog/charlotte-cushman-and-the-cushman-club/ If you enjoyed the show, PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW! You can do it easily, right here: ht…
 
Mike Lueger of "The Theatre History Podcast" interviews Dr. Christian DuComb about the history of Philadelphia Mummers Parade, the history behind the iconic annual Philadelphia event, and the 'Mummers Wench'. Although I've added some additional material, originally this interview was originally released as Episode 55 of The Theatre History Podcast.…
 
What was Philadelphia to do, in an age when theater audiences were Running Riot? Why, of course! . . build them an Academy, and fill it with Grand Opera. See the Blog Post for this Episode on our website: https://www.aithpodcast.com/blog/the-broad-street-opera-house-blog-post-and-bibliography-for-episode-22/ If you enjoyed the show, PLEASE LEAVE US…
 
Bad behavior, bigotry and boorishness were often on display in many early 19th Century theater audiences. Philadelphia's New Theatre, on Chestnut Street, as well as being the premiere home for drama in America, could also be the site of riots, uproar - and cruelty. Three stories, all found in the published memoirs of manager and actor William H. Wo…
 
In honor of Native American Heritage Month, an exploration of performances by Indigenous People in theaters of the City of Philadelphia in the 19th Century. We also detail plays by white performers that supposedly depicted Native people and stories in that period. The attached image for the episode is a detail of an illustration found in the book "…
 
Louisa Lane Drew was a prominent lady in Philadelphia, known for her management of "Mrs. John Drew's Arch Street Theatre". We continue the story we began in Part One, and complete our examination of her life and career, covering the period from 1862 to 1897. We even finally bring on the Barrymores! And, of course, Mrs. Malaprop. Voice of Mrs. Drew …
 
Louisa Lane Drew was a prominent lady in Philadelphia, known for her management of "Mrs. John Drew's Arch Street Theatre". We begin the story of her rise to fame and respectability, and chronicle her early years, long before she became the grandmother of All Them Barrymores. For images and additional commentary about this topic, as well as a biblio…
 
Fanny Kemble feels trapped in her new marriage, and learns the stark truth about American slavery and how she herself has become implicated in its horrors. We detail in this episode how, after a long struggle, she finally works her way back to moral clarity and and financial independence. It has a lot to do with the power of Shakespeare, it turns o…
 
Fanny Kemble and her father Charles Kemble, representatives of the most famous English theatrical family of their day, appeared at both the Chestnut Street Theatre and Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia in the early 1830s, during their tour of America. Though Charles was a star himself, it was the beautiful and vivacious Fanny that audiences rea…
 
Edwin Forrest returns to his home city in the final decades of his life. He keeps performing on the city's stages, and creates his long-term legacy in Philadelphia. For photographs and additional commentary about this topic, see our website's blog post! https://www.aithpodcast.com/blog/Episode-15-See-The-Players-Well-Bestowed/ For more about Edwin …
 
The second installment of the story of Philadelphia's own Edwin Forrest, the first great star of the American Stage! In this episode we cover the period from 1829 to 1836, when he was building the repertoire of roles that would shape his career: Metamora, Spartacus, and Jack Cade. You can learn more about our podcast, find additional episodes and b…
 
This is an edited version of the interview with Peter Schmitz by Mike Lueger of "The Theatre History Podcast". In the interview, Peter tries to answer Mike's many excellent questions about this podcast, such as: "Why Philadelphia?" To listen to more episode of The Theatre History Podcast, go to: https://theatrehistorypodcast.net/ If you have any qu…
 
We begin to explore the story of Philadelphia's own Edwin Forrest, the first great star of the American Stage! We follow him from birth, through his early years, to his initial success. You can learn more about our podcast, find additional episodes and blog posts, and leave a review of the show at our website: www.AITHpodcast.com To view a blog pos…
 
Fires were a real danger in 19th Century theater, and some Philadelphia theaters were burned down and rebuilt multiple times. Inevitably, in some of these fires performers, audience members, and firefighters lost their lives. In this episode we go on exploration of how theater fires in the 1800s affect the physical environment that we experience pl…
 
Wars, fires, melodramas, circuses, balloons, and ice cream . . . plus, for even more excitement, an examination of the economic model of American Theater in its early years! Woohoo! They're all in this episode, as we complete our multi-episode exploration of Philadelphia Theater History in the period from 1793-1820. To view the episode blog entry w…
 
George Frederick Cooke, one of the greatest actors of the English stage, came to town in 1811 while on a barnstorming tour of America. His performances of Shakespeare astonished audiences, and his visit left behind vivid stories of his wild behavior. Other things about him still remain in Philadelphia, too . . . Want to see illustrations and more c…
 
The hurricanes of World History blow a French equestrian circus company all the way to Philadelphia. The Walnut Street Theatre is born. Meanwhile back on Chestnut Street, the New Theatre is forging ahead with its annual seasons of plays and spectacles. Some historical figures of our story depart, and some new ones arrive. Benefits are awarded to al…
 
Philadelphia's premiere theater company rings in the New Year of 1800 with their production of the spectacular Romance entitled "Blue Beard, or Female Curiosity". Meanwhile, in the audience, there are other dramatic events taking place! Join us on this Adventure in Theater History, as we take a snapshot of early American theater on the cusp of the …
 
An examination of two works by artist John Lewis Krimmel, as they relate to the history of theater and public performance in early 19th Century Philadelphia. The first image can be found online at: "Nightlife in Philadelphia—an Oyster Barrow in front of the Chestnut Street Theater", Metropolitan Museum of Art Collections. https://www.metmuseum.org/…
 
The final installment of our story about John Bill Ricketts, with more adventures about his equestrian circus and theatrical troupe. We meet the American comedian and dancer John Durang, and Ricketts has his portrait painted by Gilbert Stuart. The Circus and Art Pantheon becomes a major fixture of Philadelphia's social scene in the transition from …
 
John Bill Ricketts completes his 1793 season of shows in Philadelphia - and gets out of town just in time to avoid the fate that laid low so many of Philadelphia's citizens that fateful year. But when Ricketts finally returns to the city, much later, he builds a new Circus and Art Pantheon right where the political leadership of the United States c…
 
We look at the influence of the English equestrian Phillip Astley, and how the equestrian circus was developing into an international form of popular entertainment in the late 18th Century. (Image: copyright of the Trustees of the British Museum, used by permission) Go to our website for a blog post with more illustrations and a bibliography of sou…
 
John Bill Ricketts, the English Equestrian, arrives in Philadelphia, and attracts the attention of a Very Important Person. How did Philadelphia become the site of the First American Circus? Listen in and find out! (Image courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum) Go to our website for a blog post with more images and a bibliography of source …
 
A broad overview of Philadelphia theater and its contribution to American drama - from the founding of Pennsylvania to the end of the 18th Century. William Penn's antipathy to all things theatrical is discussed, as well as the continuing effects of Quakerism's distrust of the performing arts during most of this period. But as Colonial America began…
 
Why we're here, and what we're trying to do with our podcast. Peter tells the story of his own personal history, and how he started on the task of researching, exploring, and teaching the history of the theater in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The matter of spelling the word "theater" (as opposed to "theatre") is explained, and the complexities and a…
 
Loading …

Hướng dẫn sử dụng nhanh

Google login Twitter login Classic login