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Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
Physics Alive is the podcast where host Brad Moser, Ph.D., sparks new life into the physics classroom. He speaks with researchers and textbook authors on the frontiers of physics education, life science and health professionals who use physics on an everyday basis, designers and engineers who learn from the natural world, teachers who employ innovative and active learning styles, and students who want the most out of their education.
 
Physics is full of captivating stories, from ongoing endeavours to explain the cosmos to ingenious innovations that shape the world around us. In the Physics World Stories podcast, Andrew Glester talks to the people behind some of the most intriguing and inspiring scientific stories. Listen to the podcast to hear from a diverse mix of scientists, engineers, artists and other commentators. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World website. If you enjoy what ...
 
Join Mobile Nations gamers each week as they discuss every aspect of the gaming world. From launch events and live streams to current events and deep thoughts on the most random of things. This is a group of platform inclusive, easily excited nerds with something to say about basically everything. Subscribe at your own risk!
 
Initial conditions provide the context in which physics happens. Likewise, in Initial Conditions: a Physics History Podcast, we provide the context in which physical discoveries happened. We dive into the collections of the Niels Bohr Library & Archives at the American Institute of Physics to uncover the unexpected stories behind the physics we know. Through these stories, we hope to challenge the conventional history of what it means to be a physicist.
 
If you have ever been fascinated by popular science and longed to explore physics on a deeper level but found text books dull and impenetrable? Have you ever listened time and again to how "all physicists agree" and thought to yourself, no wonder we are in trouble if they all agree to that! Then this is maybe for you. Having grown bored of the religious dogma that often passes for physics these days, Dr Bry decided to take a look for himself, his battle cry "Nullius in Verba", On the word of ...
 
As fascinating as physics can be, it can also seem very abstract, but behind each experiment and discovery stands a real person trying to understand the universe. Join us at the Cavendish Laboratory on the first Thursday of every month as we get up close and personal with the researchers, technicians, students, teachers, and people that are the beating heart of Cambridge University’s Physics department. Each episode also covers the most exciting and up-to-date physics news coming out of our ...
 
Radio Physics is for everyone! You don't have to be a scientist or even an aficionado to be fascinated by the questions and answers that you'll hear between 4:30 and 5:00 on the fourth Tuesday of every month. Radio Physics is a collaboration with top high school physics students from Aspen to Rifle, the Aspen Center for Physics, and KDNK Community Radio in Carbondale. Students interview one of the more than 1,000 physicists who visit the Aspen Center for Physics every year.
 
Beyond the Physics is a podcast run by Joseph Guzman and Irene Roman, PhD physics students, who hope to learn more about the universe, and the people that make up the culture behind the science. Come along as we hope to tackle some of the most difficult, and thought provoking questions of our time, and shatter the notions of what it takes to be a physicist.
 
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show series
 
Everyone knew something big was coming. Students had camped outside CERN’s designated seminar hall overnight in the hope of grabbing one of the few unreserved seats. Finally, on the morning of 4 July 2012, the suspense was ended. Spokespeople for the large hadron collider’s two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, confirmed the rumours: both…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we explore how climate change is affecting human and natural systems with Noah Diffenbaugh, who leads The Climate and Earth System Dynamics Group at Stanford University in California. Diffenbaugh is editor-in-chief of the new journal Environmental Research: Climate, which is published by Institute…
 
Numerous game companies are speaking out in support of reproductive rights for their employees after the US Supreme Court has revoked Roe v. Wade. Rebecca and Jen are joined by special guest Miles Dompier for a conversation about this along with our review of The Quarry, a new Pokémon game, and more. LINKS: The Quarry review: A summer horror blockb…
 
Jim talks with James Owen Weatherall about his work on viewing general relativity as an effective field theory and where it should give way to another theory. General relativity does a very good job of describing the world we see in astronomical observations, but certain results, e.g. singularities, and certain limits, e.g. the Planck scale, hint t…
 
Today we talk about the gigantic ball of stuff that we're floating around. The Sun is easily the most prominent feature in our sky; landing itself as the most important symbol in ancient astronomy. To all our listeners out there, we are so happy to say that you can head over to https://brilliant.org/mpp , and the first 200 of you to sign up will ge…
 
To mark AI in Medical Physics Week, in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we take a look at some of the many applications of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning in medical physics and healthcare. First up, we talk to Rishab Jain, a high school student named as America’s Top Young Scientist when he was just 13, and one of…
 
Jen and Rebecca are joined by Sam Tolbert for an update on Activision Blizzard, Overwatch 2, and Final Fantasy 7 Rebirth. Overwatch 2 will be free-to-play in all sorts of places, while Final Fantasy 7 Rebirth is a PS5 exclusive. They also chat about the announcement of Dragon's Dogma 2, and what to expect at the upcoming Nintendo Direct. LINKS: Act…
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast the physicist and entrepreneur Daniel Shaddock explains how building gravitational-wave detectors inspired him to co-found a company that takes a novel approach to creating test and measurement equipment. Shaddock is CEO of Liquid Instruments, and he explains how the firm uses field programmable g…
 
There is no E3 this year, but that didn't stop multiple publishers, and even our own parent company, from hosting announcements for a staggering number of new games. We're here for you with all the highlights and our own most assuredly amazing ideas. LINKS: Summer Game Fest 2022: Game announcements, trailers, and everything you missed | Windows Cen…
 
If we want more people to become interested in physics, sending out the wrong signals about the discipline on social media is the surest way to fail. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Georgina Phillips of the Institute of Physics (IOP) explains the importance of social media in reaching groups of people who are under-represented …
 
There's a ludicrous amount of game news to cover this week. We go in-depth with everything from the PlayStation State of Play, Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, and more. LINKS: PlayStation State of Play: Everything announced for PS VR2 | Android Central PlayStation State of Play: Everything announced in the June 2022 showcase | Android Central Resident …
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Jenni Strabley and Simon McAdams of Quantinuum explain how quantum computers could be used to simulate industrially relevant quantum systems such as the large molecules used in pharmaceuticals and the materials used in hydrogen fuel cells. Quantinuum offers quantum computing hardware and software…
 
This month, our guest is Stuart Macpherson, Post-doctoral researcher in experimental opto-electronics in the Stranks Lab at the Department of Physics. Stuart’s research focuses on understanding the physics of solar photovoltaics based on perovskite compound, one of the fastest advancing solar technologies of today. Stuart is also the founder of Sus…
 
From windows and bottles, to optical fibres and solar cells, glass is an incredibly versatile material that underpins many technologies. In the June episode of the Physics World Stories podcast, Andrew Glester explores a lesser known application of glass – bioglass in healthcare. First you will hear from Julian Jones at Imperial College London, who…
 
In this episode, I talk about DNA: a simple DNA diffraction and interference experiment using the spring from a pen, and the DNA, the structure of my introductory physics class during the spring '22 semester. Full show notes at: www.physicsalive.com/dna DNA Diffraction and Interference Lab and/or Demonstration Figure 1: X-ray diffraction pattern of…
 
Content Warning: Please note that we address the recent school shooting in Uvalde, TX during the first third of this week's show. If you'd prefer to not listen to that segment, skip ahead to 27:43 in the episode. In some positive video gaming news, the Raven Software QA unit has voted to unionize, and a teaser for Star Wars Jedi: Survivor was relea…
 
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