Science And Technology công khai
[search 0]
Thêm
Download the App!
show episodes
 
Get your weekly burst of scientific illumination from The Debrief’s network of rebellious journalists as they warp through the latest breaking science and tech news from the world of tomorrow. Every Friday, join hosts Stephanie Gerk, Kenna Hughes-Castleberry, and MJ Banias as they roundup the latest science and tech stories from the pages of The Debrief. From far-future technology to space travel to strange physics that alters our perception of the universe, The Debrief Weekly Report is mean ...
  continue reading
 
Learn about everyday wonders of science and technology! Wydea Wonders animated videos explain topics ranging from computer networking and digital music to airplanes and engines in an easy-to-understand, interesting way. For more information and additional content please visit www.wydea.com.
  continue reading
 
The STEMCAST is a semi-monthly podcast released on Mondays. It is hosted by us, Jess and Elisabeth. We talk about anything, and everything, affecting us on our journey through engineering! We also offer terrible advice to students, scientists, researchers, (etc.) and pretty much anyone that asks about school.
  continue reading
 
Loading …
show series
 
This fifth edition of Film, Form, and Culture (Routledge, 2024) offers a lively introduction to both the formal and cultural aspects of film. With extensive analysis of films past and present, this textbook explores how films are constructed from part to whole: from the smallest unit of the shot to the way shots are edited together to create narrat…
  continue reading
 
In the fourth bonus episode of the DWR, Steph and Kenna discuss the Star Wars Expanded Universe and its impact on fan experiences. The dynamic duo also dives into how the expanded universe has helped bring in more fans, creating a multigenerational experience. Every Tuesday, join hosts Stephanie Gerk, Kenna Hughes-Castleberry, and MJ Banias as they…
  continue reading
 
Energy storage equalises the supply of renewables with the demand for electricity. This week we talk to Professor Seamus Garvey, Professor of Dynamics at the University of Nottingham about the different forms of energy storage, how it works, why it is the best way to ensure secure supply on the road to Net Zero, and what the future holds.…
  continue reading
 
Game worlds differ from traditional fictional worlds. While literary and cinematic worlds are written to host character arcs and plots, game worlds need to be designed to host game mechanics. While Princess Leia, Mad Max and Daenerys Targaryen may leave their marks on their fictional worlds, it is YOU, the player, who will carve your personal exper…
  continue reading
 
The Dangerous Art of Text Mining: A Methodology for Digital History (Cambridge UP, 2022) celebrates the bold new research now possible because of text mining: the art of counting words over time. However, this book also presents a warning: without help from the humanities, data science can distort the past and lead to perilous errors. The book open…
  continue reading
 
There is in certain circles a widely held belief that the only proper kind of knowledge is scientific knowledge. This belief often runs parallel to the notion that legitimate knowledge is obtained when a scientist follows a rigorous investigative procedure called the 'scientific method'. In Do the Humanities Create Knowledge? (Cambridge UP, 2023), …
  continue reading
 
How can we restore America's frontier spirit, foster innovation, and stave off decay? Chris Buskirk sits down to discuss his new book America and the Art of the Possible: Restoring National Vitality in an Age of Decay. Along the way, he delves into the history of innovation from Augustan Rome to the Scottish Enlightenment to Silicon Valley, whether…
  continue reading
 
On this week's episode of The Debrief Weekly Report, Kenna and Steph seek out the lost settlers of the Roanoke colony, and new research that may have solved the riddle of what happened there all those years ago. Things also get hot when they discuss a new solar power system that can generate tons of heat, and how false memories are becoming much mo…
  continue reading
 
Well into the new millennium, the analog cassette tape continues to claw its way back from obsolescence. New cassette labels emerge from hipster enclaves while the cassette’s likeness pops up on T-shirts, coffee mugs, belt buckles, and cell phone cases. In Unspooled: How the Cassette Made Music Shareable (Duke University Press, 2024), Dr. Rob Drew …
  continue reading
 
Cyrus McCormick invented the revolutionary mechanical reaper in 1831...right? At least, that's how the story has been told for decades. In Harvesting History: McCormick's Reaper, Heritage Branding, and Historical Forgery (U Nebraska Press, 2023), National Park Service historian Daniel Ott argues that not only have textbooks and other sources of his…
  continue reading
 
We have increasingly sophisticated ways of acquiring and communicating knowledge, but efforts to spread this knowledge often encounter resistance to evidence. The phenomenon of resistance to evidence, while subject to thorough investigation in social psychology, is acutely under-theorised in the philosophical literature. Mona Simion's Resistance to…
  continue reading
 
Black Networked Resistance: Strategic Rearticulations in the Digital Age (U California Press, 2024)​ explores the creative range of Black digital users and their responses to varying forms of oppression, utilizing cultural, communicative, political, and technological threads both on and offline. Raven Maragh-Lloyd demonstrates how Black users strat…
  continue reading
 
Through a skillful combination of economic and cultural history, this book describes the impact on Moldavia and Wallachia of steam navigation on the Danube. The Danube route integrated the two principalities into a dense network of European roads and waterways. From the 1830s to the 1860s, steamboat transport transformed time and space for the area…
  continue reading
 
From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, the industrial revolution transformed Britain from an agricultural and artisanal economy to one dominated by industry, ushering in unprecedented growth in technology and trade and putting the country at the center of the global economy. But the commonly accepted story of the industrial revolution, anc…
  continue reading
 
What isn't counted doesn't count. And mainstream institutions systematically fail to account for feminicide, the gender-related killing of women and girls, including cisgender and transgender women. Against this failure, Counting Feminicide: Data Feminism in Action (MIT Press, 2024) brings to the fore the work of data activists across the Americas …
  continue reading
 
Thousands of shows have opened on Broadway. Why do we remember some and not others? The musical theatre repertory is not composed of titles popular in the theatre but by those with successful cast recordings, movie versions, or even illegal bootlegs on YouTube. The shows audiences know, and the texts and music they expect to hear when they attend a…
  continue reading
 
Educational analytics tend toward aggregation, asking what a “normative” learner does. In The Left Hand of Data: Designing Education Data for Justice (MIT Press, 2024, open access at this link), educational researchers Matthew Berland and Antero Garcia start from a different assumption—that outliers are, and must be treated as, valued individuals. …
  continue reading
 
On this week's episode of The Debrief Weekly Report, Kenna and Steph dive head first into a lava tube in Saudi Arabia that once served as a human dwelling. They also discuss how a new swarming technology can be used to clean up microplastics and other pollutants in our oceans, and recap on the wild solar storm that hit Earth over the weekend. Every…
  continue reading
 
In this episode Pat speaks with Dr John Noel Viaña. Dr John Noel Viaña’s work is focused on the social and ethical aspects of neuroscience and biotechnology. He has interests in a range of bioethical issues and has engaged with researchers, clinicians and science communicators to explore justice, equity and diversity considerations in health resear…
  continue reading
 
In this episode of the CEU Press Podcast, host Andrea Talabér (CEU Press/CEU Review of Books) sat down with Per Högselius and Achim Klüppelberg to discuss their new book with CEU Press entitled, The Soviet Nuclear Archipelago: A Historical Geography of Atomic-Powered Communism (CEU Press, 2023). The book is available Open Access, click here to down…
  continue reading
 
Loading …

Hướng dẫn sử dụng nhanh