Yorker công khai
[search 0]
Thêm

Download the App!

show episodes
 
RingTales brings the world famous cartoons of The New Yorker to fully animated life. They're short. They're smart. They're wickedly funny. They feature the hysterical work of renowned cartoon artists such as Sam Gross, Bob Mankoff and Roz Chast. Enjoy a bite-sized gift of comic comedy three times a week. Animation that's addictive. You can't watch just one.
 
Loading …
show series
 
With the world overheating, glaciers melting, and landscapes in flames, it’s difficult to think of a harder or more important job than John Kerry’s. The former senator and Secretary of State is now the special Presidential envoy for climate, a Cabinet-level post created by President Biden. Kerry talks with David Remnick about reasserting the United…
 
In the immediate aftermath of January 6th, politicians from both parties vilified the mob’s assault. But Republicans scuttled plans for an independent commission to investigate the riot, and the select committee organized by House Democrats has been repeatedly attacked by Republicans. Still, this week, on the first day of hearings, several officers…
 
Tessa Hadley reads her story “Coda,” from the August 2, 2021, issue of the magazine. Hadley has published ten books of fiction, including the story collection “Bad Dreams and Other Stories” and the novel “Late In the Day,” which was published in 2019. She is a winner of the 2016 Wyndham-Campbell literature prize.…
 
New Yorker Magazine July 26, 2021 This week Yianni and Willie discuss a Russian's fighting back, a disturbing experiment in Germany's past, and the satirist Ishmael Reed, plus all the bits and bobs along the way. So sit back and enjoy because we've got it! 0:00 Cover by Christoph Niemann 2:15 Mailbag 2:47 The Talk of the Town 12:08 Hope Against Hop…
 
The indictment reads like a not-so-great spy novel: the operatives would kidnap the dissident from her home in Brooklyn, deliver her to the waterfront to meet a speedboat, bring her by sea to Venezuela, and then move her on to Tehran—where she would, presumably, face a show trial, and perhaps execution. But this was no potboiler. The Iranian nation…
 
The New York City mayoral primary, which culminated in a vote held in June, was full of surprises, including the introduction of ranked-choice voting to a confused electorate, and the presence of Andrew Yang, a newcomer to municipal politics who quickly attained front-runner status. But the winning Democrat was no surprise. Eric Adams is the boroug…
 
The New York City mayoral primary, which culminated in a vote held in June, was full of surprises, including the introduction of ranked-choice voting to a confused electorate, and the presence of Andrew Yang, a newcomer to municipal politics who quickly attained front-runner status. But the winning Democrat was no surprise. Eric Adams is the boroug…
 
The opening ceremony for the 2020 Summer Olympics, in Tokyo, is scheduled for Friday. With COVID{:.small}-19 cases spiking worldwide, and Japan under a state of emergency, many wonder whether the Olympics should be cancelled. Angela Ruggiero competed in four Olympic Games as a member of the U.S. Women’s Hockey Team, winning a gold medal at the 1998…
 
New Yorker Magazine July 12 & 19, 2021 This week Yianni and Willie discuss a son's ode to his father, the pains of growing, the meaning of snow pussy cats, and cults mama, plus all the bits and bobs along the way. So please take a few moments now to locate your nearest escape. In some cases, your nearest escape may be behind you. If we need to esca…
 
Shabana Basij-Rasikh is the co-founder of Afghanistan’s only all-girls boarding school, and she is anxiously waiting to see if the Taliban—which brutally opposes the education of girls and women—will make inroads in Kabul. “I was speaking with a young woman,” Basij-Rasikh told the staff writer Sue Halpern, “and she said, ‘Yes, sure, the Taliban wil…
 
Since the U.S. withdrawal began, Taliban forces have re-captured more than a quarter of Afghanistan’s districts. Shabana Basij-Rasikh is the co-founder of the country’s only all-girls boarding school, and she is anxiously waiting to see if the Taliban—which brutally opposes the education of girls and women—will make inroads in Kabul. At SOLA, the S…
 
Marcia Chatelain, a historian at Georgetown, recently won the Pulitzer Prize for History for her book “Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America.” Chatelain looks at how McDonald’s leveraged the social upheaval of the nineteen-sixties to gain a permanent foothold in Black communities across the country. McDonald’s strategically positioned franc…
 
This week, protests erupted in cities and towns across Cuba as people responded to food and medicine shortages, and to a gutted economy made even worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, Haiti is facing widespread instability after the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse. President Biden's foreign policy thus far has focused on the th…
 
New Yorker Magazine July 12 & 19, 2021 This week Yianni and Willie discuss George Floyd Square, a dandy chasing girls, straight people relationships, and why Willie hates fiction, plus all the bits and bobs along the way. So escape your life for forty minutes or so with the podcast! 0:00 Cover by Malika Favre 1:54 Mail Bag 2:28 The Talk of the Town…
 
The U.S. economy seems to be showing real signs of life, and lots of people are finally returning to the labor force—eight hundred and fifty thousand in the month of June alone. At the same time, job resignations are at a record high, and many workers are changing careers. With work life at top of mind, we asked three writers to tell us about the m…
 
Britney Spears has been one of the world’s most prominent pop stars since her début, in the late nineteen-nineties. But, since 2008, she’s been under a court-ordered conservatorship—a form of legal guardianship—which has restricted nearly all aspects of her life. Details about the arrangement have been kept out of public view, all while Spears has …
 
In the winter of 2007, a songwriter by the name of Justin Vernon returned to the Wisconsin woods, not far from where he grew up. Just a few months later, he emerged with “For Emma, Forever Ago”—his first album produced under the name Bon Iver. Since then, Vernon and various bandmates have released three more records, won two Grammys, and collaborat…
 
Rebecca Curtis reads her story “Satellites,” from the July 12 & 19, 2021, issue of the magazine. Curtis is the author of the story collection “Twenty Grand: And Other Tales of Love and Money” and a winner of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award for Fiction.Bởi WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
New Yorker Magazine July 5, 2021 This week Yianni and Willie discuss what's up with cockatoo's in paintings, the perks of deadlines, the terrifying case surrounding Kyle Rittenhouse, and the comeback of communal living, plus all the bits and bobs along the way. So celebrate by sharing a hotdog and enjoy the episode! 0:00 Cover by R. Kikuo Johnson 2…
 
Janet Mock first heard the word “māhū,” a Native Hawaiian word for people who exist outside the male-female binary, when she was twelve. She had just moved back to Oahu, where she was born, from Texas, and, by that point, Mock knew that the gender she presented as didn’t feel right. “I don’t like to say the word ‘trapped,’ ” Mock tells The New York…
 
In the years leading up to the horrific Tulsa massacre of 1921, the Greenwood district was a thriving Black metropolis, a city within a city. Buoyed by money from Oklahoma’s oil boom, it was home to the original Cotton Club and to one of the first Black-owned daily newspapers in the United States, the Tulsa Star. The Star’s founder and editor was A…
 
Britney Spears has been one of the world’s most prominent pop stars since her début, in the late nineteen-nineties. But, since 2008, she’s been under a court-ordered conservatorship—a form of legal guardianship—which has restricted nearly all aspects of her life. Details about the arrangement have been kept out of public view, all while Spears has …
 
In September, 2020, the writer Christopher Rufo appeared on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” to discuss the threat posed by “critical race theory.” Rufo had come across the term while looking into the origins of the anti-racism movement, and saw its potential as a conservative target. In the months since, critical race theory has been condemned by Presiden…
 
Gm Kings & Queens!...Hmu w/your thoughts on this ep...Who's to blame?..Do we ever check ourselves?...Trending ish & more!!...Life is too short..Have fun!...Love,Live,Laugh!!🥰🙏🏽🤣
 
Sam Lipsyte reads his story “My Apology,” from the July 5, 2021, issue of the magazine. Lipsyte is the author of six books of fiction, including the story collection “The Fun Parts,” and the novels “The Ask” and “Hark,” which was published in 2019.Bởi WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
New Yorker Magazine June 28, 2021 Happy Pride everyone! This week Yianni and Willie discuss what's up with pets, putting your baby to sleep, Joe "Mansion" Manchin, and women who just wanna be priest man, plus all the bits and bobs along the way. So be proud and joyful and enjoy the episode! 0:00 Cover by Nicole Rifkin 1:15 Mail Bag 2:09 The Talk of…
 
More than half a million people in America today lack housing. Some sixty-six thousand live in Los Angeles County alone. Among them is Augustus Evans, whose desire for steady work was thwarted by a felony record for bank robbery. Evans has been homeless for about a decade, but, for more than seven years, he’s kept a roof over his head and put some …
 
Across the country, COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available for teen-agers. But most states still require parental consent for minors to receive the shot. David Remnick spoke with a teen-ager who asked that we call him Aaron Williams. He is desperate to be vaccinated, but his parents are skeptical. “We waited three months, and, during the span of …
 
Over the first five months of Biden's presidency, with the Democrats holding the slimmest possible majority in the Senate, President Biden has consistently run into the resistance of one man: Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Biden's policy agenda requires cooperation from every Democrat in the Senate, but Manchin, a moderate who values biparti…
 
Camille Bordas reads her story from the June 28, 2021, issue of the magazine. Bordas has published two novels in France, “Les Treize Desserts” and “Partie Commune.” Her first novel in English, “How to Behave in a Crowd,” was published in 2017.Bởi WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
New Yorker Magazine June 21, 2021 Yianni and Willie discuss homeschooling, renaissance composer Josquin Desprez, and the immensely talented French actor Omar Sy, plus all the bits and bobs along the way. So grab your local fauna and enjoy the episode! 0:00 Cover by Peter de Sève 1:30 Mail 3:32 The Talk of the Town 10:32 Going Home by Casey Parks 20…
 
In the years leading up to the horrific Tulsa massacre of 1921, the Greenwood district was a thriving Black metropolis, a city within a city. Buoyed by money from Oklahoma’s oil boom, it was home to the original Cotton Club and to one of the first Black-owned daily newspapers in the United States, the Tulsa Star. The Star’s founder and editor was A…
 
In 2013, David Remnick published a profile of Naftali Bennett. He wrote that Bennett was something new in Israeli politics, a man who would “build a sturdy electoral bridge between the religious and the secular, the hilltop outposts of the West Bank and the start-up suburbs.” Though religiously observant, Bennett was cosmopolitan: fluent on Faceboo…
 
In 2013, David Remnick published a profile of Naftali Bennett. He wrote that Bennett was something new in Israeli politics, a man who would “build a sturdy electoral bridge between the religious and the secular, the hilltop outposts of the West Bank and the start-up suburbs.” Though religiously observant, Bennett was cosmopolitan: fluent on Faceboo…
 
Merrick Garland made his legal reputation as a temperate moderate dedicated to keeping politics out of the justice system. Yet in the past few years, he has found himself at the center of two of the most fiercely partisan episodes in recent history. First, his nomination to the Supreme Court was blocked by obstructionist Republicans. And now, as At…
 
New Yorker Magazine June 14, 2021 Yianni and Willie discuss country music, the Roman emperor Nero, an evangelical accused of murdering her husband, and whether New York City is back baby, plus all the bits and bobs between in this groovy episode. So ease back and enjoy the episode! 0:00 Cover by Adrian Tomine 2:25 Talk of the Town 9:08 Another Coun…
 
Next week, the Southern Baptist Convention will hold its annual meeting. It’s the largest Protestant denomination in the country, and, as the group gathers to elect a new president, it is facing a crisis of identity. At issue is critical-race theory, which the presidential candidate Pastor Mike Stone and many other conservatives have called an extr…
 
The largest Protestant denomination in America is in crisis over the group’s reluctance to acknowledge systemic racism; our reporter talks with the Reverend Dwight McKissic, who considered himself a loyalist but may have reached a breaking point. Plus, our producer looks at the GameStop squeeze of last winter and tries to figure out the motives of …
 
It’s easy to see why the director Jon M. Chu was adamant that the release of “In the Heights” wait until this summer, when more people could see it in theatres: it’s big, it’s colorful, the dance sequences are complex—it’s a spectacle in the best sense of the term. “In the Heights,” based on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit stage musical, is a love letter …
 
Loading …

Hướng dẫn sử dụng nhanh

Google login Twitter login Classic login