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The Economist unlocks American politics, tackling a new theme each week and digging into the data, ideas, and history shaping the country at this dramatic moment. John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Correspondents from across the US and the rest of the world plus expert guests - politicians, pollsters, professors - join the in-depth reporting and discussion every Friday.
 
The World in Brief from The Economist tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full World in Brief, three times each day: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer. Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://www.economist.com/espresso for access to the full World ...
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic.
 
We deliver vital business intelligence to executives the world over. With access to over 650 expert analysts and editors across 200 countries worldwide, underpinned by an unrivalled in-house survey panel that bolsters the qualitative and quantitative analysis, we uncover novel and forward-looking perspectives.
 
The EIU Digital Economy podcast is a monthly series examining the technologies, ideas and people driving the digitisation of the global economy. Sponsored by DXC, the podcast aims to help business leaders understand the way in which digital technology affects their companies, their teams, and their careers.
 
Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both ...
 
Rising global temperatures have already increased the frequency of floods, wildfires, droughts, and heatwaves around the world. If humanity does not change course rapidly, the effects of climate change will become more extreme. What can be done to avoid this outcome? Vijay Vaitheeswaran, the Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, will be joined weekly by expert guests to explore how everything—from finance to agriculture, transport to international policy—will have to chang ...
 
Since the late 19th century, politics and economics have been split from each other, pretended and positioned as separate and unassuming forces. This could not be further from the truth. Before the dawn of Adam Smith, the grandfather of modern day economics, there was but one holistic concept, the Political Economy. Come join Max and Jorrel, modern day Political Economists, as they do their best to converse and discuss political theory, history, economics, and more in the lenses of contempor ...
 
Do you consider economics to be boring and overly complex? This podcast will change your mind. Tune in to grasp complex economic theory, problems and events in a digestible way so you can keep informed and empower yourself with the tools to engage in intellectual debate. If you're looking to boost your general knowledge of world-wide economic events and understand how changes in markets and government policies affect your well-being, this is the place to start. Follow and contact me on Insta ...
 
For over 60 years CEDA has debated and discussed critical issues through our research and events platform – now we bring the conversation right to you with our Podcasts. Hear directly from some of the best and brightest policy minds in Australia and around the world, alongside our CEO Melinda Cilento and Chief Economist Jarrod Ball, as we explore the issues and pursue solutions that deliver better economic and social outcomes for the greater good.
 
The Digital Economist Speaker Series drives radical collaboration between global action leaders on the most urgent topics and challenges we face today: climate, health, society, economics. With the global population facing multiple man-made crises that threaten our existence and the wellbeing of the planet, using science and technology to serve human needs is no longer a choice – it's a necessity.
 
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show series
 
In an 80-minute phone call with Vladimir Putin France’s president, Emmanuel Macron, and Germany’s chancellor, Olaf Scholz, urged the Russian president to enter “serious direct negotiations” with Volodymyr Zelensky, his Ukrainian counterpart. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
The horror at Uvalde in Texas shows American exceptionalism at its worst. But part of the tragedy is that the event in itself is not exceptional. In the ten years since the massacre at Sandy Hook, there have been more than 900 other shootings in schools across the country. Why can’t America stop gun violence? Former firearms executive turned safety…
 
POLLS SUGGEST // Polls suggest the country might get its first-ever leftist leader. Whatever the outcome, a fresh outbreak of violent protest may await. Africa’s increasingly crippling fuel shortages can be blamed on more than just higher prices. And reflecting on the life of Lawrence MacEwen, laird of a tiny Scottish island whose austere simplicit…
 
This week the global elite gathered in Davos for the World Economic Forum against a backdrop of rising commodity prices, soaring inflation and conflict in Europe. Host Anne McElvoy assesses the economic fallout with Patrick Foulis, The Economist’s business affairs editor, and our finance and economics editor, Rachana Shanbhogue. Anne also talks to …
 
Misinformation and Economic Competition The Biden administration’s Disinformation Governance Board spells disaster for “misinformation” and economic competition within a civilized society. People should be free I often ask my students at Dallas Baptist University if they’re still required to read Animal Farm in high school. I’m quite pleased by the…
 
Since 1900, the global economy has fallen into a recession about once a decade on average. In 2020, the world experienced the deepest downturn since the second world war. Just two years on, is another recession on the way? This week, hosts Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird focus on the economic slowdown in the world’s two biggest economies - in America …
 
In part two of our visit to the Large Hadron Collider on the Franco-Swiss border, Alok Jha asks whether the machine’s next iteration can take the field of particle physics beyond the Standard Model. We also investigate the long-term future of particle colliders. Will scientists ever build the instruments required to reveal the true building blocks …
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the war in ukraine is tipping a fragile world towards mass hunger (10:36), why the tide is out for cryptocurrency assets (16:40), and pouring graphene’s bright future. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audi…
 
"The pandemic might be winding down, but the disruptions are here to stay." To be successful in business many companies are lean. They don't hold excess inventory or supplies. This has worked for decades. For example, if the plastic on the greenhouse rips the grower goes to the hardware store and replaces it easily. Today, almost every industry is …
 
The horror at Uvalde in Texas shows American exceptionalism at its worst. But part of the tragedy is that the event in itself is not exceptional. In the ten years since the massacre at Sandy Hook, there have been more than 900 other shootings in schools across the country. Why can’t America stop gun violence? Former firearms executive turned safety…
 
POLLS SUGGEST // Polls suggest the country might get its first-ever leftist leader. Whatever the outcome, a fresh outbreak of violent protest may await. Africa’s increasingly crippling fuel shortages can be blamed on more than just higher prices. And reflecting on the life of Lawrence MacEwen, laird of a tiny Scottish island whose austere simplicit…
 
This week the global elite gathered in Davos for the World Economic Forum against a backdrop of rising commodity prices, soaring inflation and conflict in Europe. Host Anne McElvoy assesses the economic fallout with Patrick Foulis, The Economist’s business affairs editor, and our finance and economics editor, Rachana Shanbhogue. Anne also talks to …
 
A long-awaited inquiry into lockdown gatherings on Boris Johnson’s watch reveals lurid details of brash bashes. Yet the prime minister will be able, once again, to brush off the controversy. We ask why Switzerland is such a powerhouse in business and finance despite its modest resources. And how Russia’s war propaganda is winning over plenty of Twi…
 
A long-awaited inquiry into lockdown gatherings on Boris Johnson’s watch reveals lurid details of brash bashes. Yet the prime minister will be able, once again, to brush off the controversy. We ask why Switzerland is such a powerhouse in business and finance despite its modest resources. And how Russia’s war propaganda is winning over plenty of Twi…
 
Since 1900, the global economy has fallen into a recession about once a decade on average. In 2020, the world experienced the deepest downturn since the second world war. Just two years on, is another recession on the way? This week, hosts Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird focus on the economic slowdown in the world’s two biggest economies - in America …
 
After 19 children and two adults were gunned down in Texas, we ask why gun laws are actually loosening in many states and why even moderate gun controls do not get passed. The rapid spread of monkeypox has rattled a covid-weary world; how much cause for concern is there? And why teams of professional writers are getting involved in games developmen…
 
After 19 children and two adults were gunned down in Texas, we ask why gun laws are actually loosening in many states and why even moderate gun controls do not get passed. The rapid spread of monkeypox has rattled a covid-weary world; how much cause for concern is there? And why teams of professional writers are getting involved in games developmen…
 
In part two of our visit to the Large Hadron Collider on the Franco-Swiss border, Alok Jha asks whether the machine’s next iteration can take the field of particle physics beyond the Standard Model. We also investigate the long-term future of particle colliders. Will scientists ever build the instruments required to reveal the true building blocks …
 
China’s Communist Party leaders have painted themselves into a corner: they cannot be seen to put the capital into lockdown, but permitting covid to spread could be catastrophic. We look into the myriad reasons behind America’s sharp shortages of baby formula, and how to solve them. And why it is illegal for women to get a manicure in Turkmenistan.…
 
China’s Communist Party leaders have painted themselves into a corner: they cannot be seen to put the capital into lockdown, but permitting covid to spread could be catastrophic. We look into the myriad reasons behind America’s sharp shortages of baby formula, and how to solve them. And why it is illegal for women to get a manicure in Turkmenistan.…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the war in ukraine is tipping a fragile world towards mass hunger (10:36), why the tide is out for cryptocurrency assets (16:40), and pouring graphene’s bright future. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audi…
 
Anthony Albanese, the first Labor prime minister in a decade, has pledged to do far more on climate change. His party’s slim win shows how Australian politics is changing. Bosses are increasingly turning to surveillance software to monitor employees (so be careful if listening to this show during work hours). And why the fortune-telling tradition o…
 
Anthony Albanese, the first Labor prime minister in a decade, has pledged to do far more on climate change. His party’s slim win shows how Australian politics is changing. Bosses are increasingly turning to surveillance software to monitor employees (so be careful if listening to this show during work hours). And why the fortune-telling tradition o…
 
President Biden came to office promising, like many before him, to fix America's immigration system. But border crossings are at record highs, his reforms have floundered and states are going their own way on how to treat undocumented residents. Meanwhile a third of voters believe there is a plan afoot to replace them with people brought in from ab…
 
President Biden came to office promising, like many before him, to fix America's immigration system. But border crossings are at record highs, his reforms have floundered and states are going their own way on how to treat undocumented residents. Meanwhile a third of voters believe there is a plan afoot to replace them with people brought in from ab…
 
The Kremlin’s propaganda machine ensures that Russians have a much different view of the war in Ukraine than the rest of the world. Our correspondent spent a day immersed in Russian media, to learn what people there see—and what they don’t. The spectre of hyperinflation is once again stalking Zimbabwe. And our obituaries editor remembers a man who …
 
The Kremlin’s propaganda machine ensures that Russians have a much different view of the war in Ukraine than the rest of the world. Our correspondent spent a day immersed in Russian media, to learn what people there see—and what they don’t. The spectre of hyperinflation is once again stalking Zimbabwe. And our obituaries editor remembers a man who …
 
The war in Ukraine has put the organisation’s founding principles and its authority on the line. Anne McElvoy asks Linda Thomas-Greenfield, the United States ambassador to the UN, how the Security Council can function in a time of division. Is the sharing of military intelligence by America an act of war? Plus, the ambassador discusses her solution…
 
The war in Ukraine has put the organisation’s founding principles and its authority on the line. Anne McElvoy asks Linda Thomas-Greenfield, the United States ambassador to the UN, how the Security Council can function in a time of division. Is the sharing of military intelligence by America an act of war? Plus, the ambassador discusses her solution…
 
#124 The March of Foolish Things Senate Majority leader Chuck Schumer wants to lower inflation by increasing taxes. This is just one of many silly economics ideas that are part of what Thomas Sowell has called “The March of Foolish Things. Today’s podcast title comes from a Wall Street Journal headline way back in……
 
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