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Nội dung được cung cấp bởi GeriPal, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera. Tất cả nội dung podcast bao gồm các tập, đồ họa và mô tả podcast đều được GeriPal, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera hoặc đối tác nền tảng podcast của họ tải lên và cung cấp trực tiếp. Nếu bạn cho rằng ai đó đang sử dụng tác phẩm có bản quyền của bạn mà không có sự cho phép của bạn, bạn có thể làm theo quy trình được nêu ở đây https://vi.player.fm/legal.
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Psychological Issues in Palliative Care: Elissa Kozlov and Des Azizoddin

45:44
 
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Manage episode 402277899 series 1279663
Nội dung được cung cấp bởi GeriPal, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera. Tất cả nội dung podcast bao gồm các tập, đồ họa và mô tả podcast đều được GeriPal, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera hoặc đối tác nền tảng podcast của họ tải lên và cung cấp trực tiếp. Nếu bạn cho rằng ai đó đang sử dụng tác phẩm có bản quyền của bạn mà không có sự cho phép của bạn, bạn có thể làm theo quy trình được nêu ở đây https://vi.player.fm/legal.

In our podcast with palliative care pioneer Susan Block, she identified the psychological/psychiatric aspects of palliative care as the biggest are of need for improvement. As she said, when you think about the hardest patients you’ve cared for, in nearly all cases there was some aspect of psychological illness involved. That rings true to me.

Today we talk with two psychologists who are deeply invested in addressing psychological aspects of care for people living with serious illness. Elissa Kozlov, a geropsychologist and director of a new population aging MPH at Rutgers, surveyed AAHPM members, and found that doctors reported major shortcomings in level of comfort and knowledge caring for patients with psychological illness. She conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 38 palliative care trials, finding that many excluded people with serious illness, and a lack of impact on psychological outcomes. Analyzing the Health and Retirement Study, she found 60% of older adults screened positive for depression in the last year of life (related study here).

Des Azizoddin is a psychologist at the University of Oklahoma primarily focused on pain for people with cancer. Des delivered a plenary at this year’s National Palliative Care Research Center’s Foley retreat. She began by asking, “Raise your hand if you think there is a psychological component to cancer pain.” All hands go up. Then, “Keep your hand up if you frequently refer patients with cancer pain to a psychologist?” All hands go down. Unfortunately, we lack the financial structures to reimburse psychologists that would incentivize widespread inclusion on palliative care teams. Because we live in the world as it is, not as it should be, Des has helped develop an app (link to pilot trial hot off the press!) to help people with cancer pain engage in cognitive behavioral therapy in bite sized 3-4 minute sessions (there are other apps available now developed in the VA, who have been leaders in the psychology/palliative care space). Des additionally studied stigma associated with opioid use among patients with cancer in the context of the opioid epidemic; depression, pain catastrophizing, recent surgery and opioid use among people with cancer.

And, we talk about these issues and more (with far more nuance than I can include in this post).

Kudos and credit to my son Renn, age 15, for the guitar on Heartbeats (hand still broken at time of recording).

  continue reading

313 tập

Artwork
iconChia sẻ
 
Manage episode 402277899 series 1279663
Nội dung được cung cấp bởi GeriPal, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera. Tất cả nội dung podcast bao gồm các tập, đồ họa và mô tả podcast đều được GeriPal, Alex Smith, and Eric Widera hoặc đối tác nền tảng podcast của họ tải lên và cung cấp trực tiếp. Nếu bạn cho rằng ai đó đang sử dụng tác phẩm có bản quyền của bạn mà không có sự cho phép của bạn, bạn có thể làm theo quy trình được nêu ở đây https://vi.player.fm/legal.

In our podcast with palliative care pioneer Susan Block, she identified the psychological/psychiatric aspects of palliative care as the biggest are of need for improvement. As she said, when you think about the hardest patients you’ve cared for, in nearly all cases there was some aspect of psychological illness involved. That rings true to me.

Today we talk with two psychologists who are deeply invested in addressing psychological aspects of care for people living with serious illness. Elissa Kozlov, a geropsychologist and director of a new population aging MPH at Rutgers, surveyed AAHPM members, and found that doctors reported major shortcomings in level of comfort and knowledge caring for patients with psychological illness. She conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 38 palliative care trials, finding that many excluded people with serious illness, and a lack of impact on psychological outcomes. Analyzing the Health and Retirement Study, she found 60% of older adults screened positive for depression in the last year of life (related study here).

Des Azizoddin is a psychologist at the University of Oklahoma primarily focused on pain for people with cancer. Des delivered a plenary at this year’s National Palliative Care Research Center’s Foley retreat. She began by asking, “Raise your hand if you think there is a psychological component to cancer pain.” All hands go up. Then, “Keep your hand up if you frequently refer patients with cancer pain to a psychologist?” All hands go down. Unfortunately, we lack the financial structures to reimburse psychologists that would incentivize widespread inclusion on palliative care teams. Because we live in the world as it is, not as it should be, Des has helped develop an app (link to pilot trial hot off the press!) to help people with cancer pain engage in cognitive behavioral therapy in bite sized 3-4 minute sessions (there are other apps available now developed in the VA, who have been leaders in the psychology/palliative care space). Des additionally studied stigma associated with opioid use among patients with cancer in the context of the opioid epidemic; depression, pain catastrophizing, recent surgery and opioid use among people with cancer.

And, we talk about these issues and more (with far more nuance than I can include in this post).

Kudos and credit to my son Renn, age 15, for the guitar on Heartbeats (hand still broken at time of recording).

  continue reading

313 tập

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